Salt Point Celebration

Walk in the Park episode 150 takes us to Salt Point Natural Area on the shore of Cayuga Lake in Lansing, NY, near the better known Myers Park on Myers Point. Salt Point forms the northern half of the delta created by Salmon Creek on the east shore of Cayuga Lake several miles north of Ithaca, NY in the Finger Lakes region, in Tompkins County. Once the site of an enormous salt works, exploiting Silurian salt deposits thousands of feet below the surface, Salt Point has been transformed into a beautiful public natural area park, after decades of neglect and misuse.
On October 16, 2017, the Friends of Salt Point dedicated a new, elaborate interpretive kiosk on the point, explaining the Salt Point’s history and nature. Throughout the celebration we learn a lot about Salt Point and what it took to transform it into a beautiful natural area park for everyone.

This episode of Walk in the Park will continue to be cablecast on Ithaca, NY channel 13 at the following times: 10:00 AM on both Saturday and Sunday, November 5 & 6; and 8:00 PM, Tuesday, November 8 (take a refreshing break from the election drama!). And, you can watch it online anytime, anywhere right here!

As an extension of this episode, watch episode 119, “Salt Point,” produced a year ago. Lansing Town Historian Louise Bement gave a slide show on the history of Salt Point, particularly focusing on its many years as the site of International Salt Company’s works there.
Walk in the Park is produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions. Walk in the Park is a weekly public access television series produced at PEGASYS Studios in Ithaca, NY.

Salt Point

“Salt Point” is this week’s new episode (#119) of Walk in the Park, premiering 9:00 tonight (10/29/15) on Ithaca’s cable channel 13 (and 97.1; also viewable online anytime below). Our cablecast of this episode will repeat on Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and on Tuesday at 8 p.m. Or you can watch it online right now or anytime right here.

Salt Point Natural Area is the lesser known and wilder northern bank of the mouth of Salmon Creek. The south bank is Myers Point, a popular park along the east shore of Cayuga Lake. But over 50 years ago, an intense salt production factory occupied Salt Point. Lansing Town Historian Louise Bement shows us the history of the International Salt Company there in a presentation recorded Oct. 22 at the Lansing Community Center. Salt Point is now a quiet, natural place for low-impact enjoyment of nature and the lakeshore.

Walk in the Park is produced by Tony Ingraham of Owl Gorge Productions  at PEGASYS public access TV studios operated by Time Warner Cable in Ithaca, NY. You can see all episodes of Walk in the Park on this video blog. And take a look at our award-winning book, A Walk through Watkins Glen–Water’s Sculpture in Stone.

 

Park Minute: Mother Nature Helped Heal 9-11

Lindsay-Parsons Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in West Danby NY south of Ithaca

The Lindsay Parsons Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in West Danby, NY south of Ithaca is a healing and inspiring landscape.

Today, as we remember that terrible day fifteen years ago, I have produced another Park Minute about the solace and healing that many sought in nature in parks upstate from New York City in the days and weeks following the horror in Manhattan.

Getting a Haendel on Cayuga Lake

For ten years, the tour boat/floating classroom MV Haendel has chugged up and down Cayuga Lake revealing the lake’s stories, taking its vital signs, and expanding our awareness of this dominant, beautiful body of water in New York’s Finger Lakes region. I have worked on the Haendel since late in its first season in 2003, mostly as an interpreter of the natural and cultural history of the lake on the boat’s tours out of Cayuga Inlet in Ithaca. The company, Tiohero Tours, has changed its name now to Ithaca Boat Tours, and we look forward to the new season sharing Cayuga’s waters with thousands of visitors, residents, and students.

The tour boat MV Haendel in Cayuga Inlet, Ithaca, NY

The MV Haendel heads down Cayuga Inlet toward Cayuga Lake on another tour from the Ithaca Farmers Market.

The other part of the Haendel’s mission is the Cayuga Lake Floating Classroom, where the crew takes school groups, college classes, camp groups, public eco-tours, and scientific monitoring teams out on the water to probe and learn more about what is happening below the surface. Besides teaching thousands about lake science, the Floating Classroom has played a vital role in assessing the health of the lake; most notably in discovering the aggressive, and potentially disastrous, exotic, invasive, aquatic weed hydrilla in Cayuga Inlet, setting off a major institutional and governmental response to try to control and eradicate the infestation.

Cayuga Lake Floating Classroom public eco-tour

Cayuga Lake Floating Classroom director Bill Foster instructs a public eco-tour participant during a lake sampling outing.

In this week’s episode of Walk in the Park TV, we take a visual tour of Cayuga Lake on the Haendel, from the Ithaca Farmers Market to Wells College in Aurora, as if we were on the boat itself. There is a lot to see from the water (and from the air in this case as we integrate Bill Hecht’s amazing aerial photography.) You can watch the show on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (next scheduled showings: Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and Tuesday, March 5, at 8:00 p.m., and at other times the station may add).

Or you can watch it online right here!

Headwaters of Cayuga Lake

See it here or see it on TV!

In this episode (#39, 2/20/13) of Walk in the Park TV (Ithaca, NY public access cable channel 13), I take you on a tour of the major tributaries and subwatersheds of Cayuga Lake, in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. Using beautiful aerial photography by Bill Hecht, we visit Cayuga’s Inlet Valley; the Lindsay Parsons Biodiversity Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust; Enfield Glen and Lucifer Falls in Robert H. Treman State Park; Buttermilk Falls State Park; Sixmile Creek Nature Preserve; Cascadilla Gorge; Cornell University; Fall Creek and its gorge and Ithaca Falls; Salmon Creek and Myers Point in Lansing, NY; Taughannock Falls State Park; and the rest of Cayuga Lake including the Seneca River and Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Finally, we trace the flow of Cayuga’s waters through the Seneca and Oswego River system to Lake Ontario, the Great Lakes, and the St. Lawrence River. Watch it here!

This show can also be seen on Ithaca’s public access TV channel 13 this Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and next Tuesday, 2/16, at 8:00 p.m.; and at other times the station may decide.

 

Does Cayuga Lake Freeze Over?

This week’s Walk in the Park TV episode answers the question, “Does Cayuga Lake ever freeze over?” Cayuga Lake is the longest of the eleven Finger Lakes and is the second deepest, with more than 2 1/2 trillion gallons of rolling water that takes ten years to cycle through the lake. Does this enormous volume ever freeze over in winter? Watch this show to find out. Much of this show is an excerpt from an earlier show I recorded in 2011 in my series called Cayuga Lake Heritage, which is available online.

North end of Cayuga Lake, Cayuga County, Seneca County, winter, Finger Lakes

The shallow north end of Cayuga Lake usually freezes in winter. Photo by Bill Hecht

This week’s episode (#38) is showing on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channel 13, beginning Thursday, 2/5/15, at 9:00 p.m., and continuing this Saturday and Sunday at 10:00 a.m. each day, and finally next Tuesday, February 10, 2015 at 8:00 p.m. It may be shown at other times as well. (Check the schedule which is often shown briefly just before the hour and half hour.) And you can also see it online right here!

Jobs in Parks

For the second year, I was asked to come to DeWitt Middle School in Ithaca to be a speaker during their “Looking to the Future Day,” their annual career day for 8th grade students. So, on November 30, I used my Powerpoint to explain the broad range of parks, preserves, and similar sites and organizations where one might pursue a career in “Parks and Recreation.” After fumbling for several minutes with wires, I hooked up a lapel mike to myself and started my video camera and recorded my talk for Walk in the Park TV (episode 31). Later, I exported all the Powerpoint slides as jpegs and then imported them into my video editor to illustrate my talk. 95% of the show is the slides with my voice beneath, while I navigate across each image on the screen as I discuss the topic. This is essentially a version of a talk I gave at Wells College last winter. You may find it interesting. It also is being shown on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13, with airings scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday, each day at 10:30 a.m., and finally on Tuesday at 8:00 p.m., though the station manager does show it at other times as well.

Below is my description of my talk for the students when they signed up for it:

Mary is a bookkeeper, Doug is a carpenter, Jane is a Jack-of-all-trades, Mike likes working with people, Brittany loves hiking, Sam loves landscaping, Jody loves kids, and Jorge is interested in law enforcement. Which among them could find a satisfying career in parks and recreation?

All of them.

It takes a broad team of professions to run a park, or a park system. Parks are natural places, but parks serve people. Every park has to strike a balance between preserving nature and making it accessible, safe, and enjoyable for the public. There is a career for you in parks and recreation, whether you are purchasing land, making a landscape plan, mowing lawns, or training staff; or constructing and maintaining park trails, roads, campgrounds, buildings, swimming areas, boat launches and marinas, golf courses, and playgrounds; or conducting nature education activities, running a concert series, staffing a recreation center, designing publications and exhibits; or managing a payroll, personnel records, grant writing, or secretarial and administrative work. If you want to be a biologist, geologist, historian, or biological technician, there are jobs in parks and recreation.

Finger Lakes Fall from the Sky

In this episode of Walk in the Park TV, we go up in the air again with Bill Hecht’s dazzling photographs of the Finger Lakes at the peak of fall colors. See it here online!

We see Ithaca, Sixmile Creek valley, Buttermilk Falls State Park (including the effects of Hurricane Sandy), Cayuga Lake, Myers Point in Lansing, Keuka Lake, Bluff Point, Keuka College, Canandaigua Lake, Naples NY, the Hi Tor State Wildlife Management Area, and the Great Hill (or South Hill) at the south end of Canandaigua Lake, considered (and celebrated) by the Seneca Nation of the Iroquois as their birthplace. Great Hill is now a Finger Lakes Land Trust Preserve.

Bluff Point Keuka Lake Finger Lakes fall colors

Bill Hecht’s photo looking south over Bluff Point at the confluence of the East Branch and West Branch of Keuka Lake in New York’s Finger Lakes region.

We fly over Cliffside State Forest in Schuyler County and Cornell University’s Arnot Forest in Tompkins County. We also go back to Ithaca Falls for a couple of short videos of the waterfall, fall colors, and fly fishermen in Fall Creek, set to music. And we reconsider a couple of maple tree species in the western United States, the bigtoothed maple in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah, and the bigleaf maple on the West Coast, from California through Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and just into southeast Alaska. Join host Tony Ingraham in this scenery-packed episode of Walk in the Park (#26).

Click here to see all Walk in the Park TV episodes, or go to Tony’s YouTube Walk in the Park playlist .

Produced by Owl Gorge Productions at PEGASYS Studios, Ithaca NY’s public access television center, run by Time Warner Cable.

You can watch the show online right here,

Or, you can catch the show on Time Warner Cable public access television channel 13 in the Ithaca area:

Thursday,  9:00 p.m.

Saturday, 10:00 a.m.

Sunday,    10:00 a.m.

Tuesday,    8:00 p.m.

It also is shown at other times as the station manager chooses.

 

 

Fall Colors in the Finger Lakes

Episode 25 of Walk in the Park TV, “Fall Colors in the Finger Lakes,” is now showing on television and online. It begins Thursday evening at 9:00 p.m. on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 and continues for the next week according to the schedule below. Meanwhile, you can see “Fall Colors in the Finger Lakes” online.

Cornell University Fall Creek Gorge Cascadilla Ithaca NY Fall Colors aerial photograph

Most of the Cornell campus is bounded on the north and south by gorges: Fall Creek Gorge on the north (left) and Cascadilla Glen on the south (right). Photograph by Bill Hecht

Join me, Tony Ingraham, in this visual trip around the Finger Lakes region, from the ground and in the air, marveling at the fall foliage extravaganza nature has put on for us in October. Visit Taughannock Falls and Buttermilk Falls State Parks, Cascadilla Gorge, Ithaca Falls and Fall Creek Gorge, Cornell University campus, Cayuga Lake, Myers Park and Salmon Creek, Seneca County, Seneca Lake, Keuka Lake, Canandaigua Lake, Watkins Glen State Park, Sixmile Creek in Ithaca, and more. Photographer Bill Hecht’s views of Taughannock Gorge from the air are incomparable, as are his views of the Cornell campus situated between Fall Creek Gorge and Cascadilla Glen and other aerial vistas around the region. We also visit Cesar Chavez National Monument in California, Fishlake National Forest and Zion National Park in Utah, and Glacier National Park in Montana.

See the show right here!

Or, you can catch the show on Time Warner Cable public access television channel 13 in the Ithaca area:

Thursday,  9:00 p.m.

Saturday, 10:00 a.m.

Sunday,    10:00 a.m.

Tuesday,    8:00 p.m.

It also is shown at other times as the station manager chooses.

Gorge Beauty, Gorge Safety

Joints, pothole by Pinnacle Rock in the gorge at Buttermilk Falls State Park in Ithaca, NY

A unique rock and water formation in the gorge below Pinnacle Rock in Buttermilk Falls State Park.

Episode 16 of my Walk in the Park TV show on Ithaca’s public access cable channel 13 begins showing tonight, Thursday August 16, at 9:00 p.m. It will air again at 10:30 a.m. on both Saturday and Sunday, and finally on Tuesday, August 21 at 8:00 p.m. And you can see it ONLINE here!

This episode includes beautiful pictures of forest reflections in gorge pools in Buttermilk Falls State Park, views of low water at Taughannock Falls, a family cliff jumping into a gorge pothole, and a powerful Cornell video explaining the dangers of swimming in our gorges, including a lab demo of dangerous stream hydraulics, and a first hand account from a student who could not save his friend from drowning while they swam in a gorge. You can watch the Cornell video separately here, if you wish. Everyone who lives in Ithaca, goes to college here, or visits during the summer should see this short video. Please share it widely.

Another segment covers the Lansing Harbor Festival, which also was posted as a separate video in a previous post on this blog.