Waterless Falls

Watchable here online, and on Ithaca, NY area cable 13. Remaining cablecasts are at 10 AM Saturday and Sunday, August 6 & 7, 2016, and finally 8 PM Tuesday, August 9.

In this episode (144) of Walk in the Park, we look at the effect of continuing drought in the Finger Lakes which leaves little water to splash down our wonderful waterfalls in the region and even threatens the City of Ithaca’s water supply in Sixmile Creek. Meanwhile, the Finger Lakes Land Trust is raising funds to protect 12,000 feet of shoreline of Sixmile Creek. We rise up in the air for a beautiful ride over the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s Hinchcliff Family Preserve above the eastern shore of Skaneateles Lake. And we compare the nearly dry falls of Watkins Glen State Park with photos from wetter times. (Thanks to photographer Michael Fraser of Captured Moments Photography).

Walk in the Park is a weekly public access TV show produced in Ithaca, NY by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions. Produced at PEGASYS Studios, Time Warner Cable.
See our national-award-winning book, A walk Through Watkins Glen-Water’s Sculpture in Stone.

Flash Flood!

A flash flood ripped through gorges in the southern Finger Lakes New York on Sunday, June 14, 2015. In this episode (107) of Walk in the Park, we focus on damage done in the upper portion of Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY. We also look at flood waters at Buttermilk Falls State Park and Watkins Glen State Park and at a tornado that damaged the campground at Watkins Glen State Park. Finally we look at odd boulders transported by glaciers during the Ice Age, around Ithaca and a three other parks around the United States.

Walk in the Park is cablecast on Ithaca TV channels 13 and 97.3 on Thursday at 9 PM, Saturday and Sunday a 10 AM, and finally on Tuesday at 8 PM.

Or you can watch it right here anytime below

Produced by Owl Gorge Productions at PEGASYS studios in Ithaca, NY, the public access TV station operated by Time Warner Cable in Ithaca.
Have you seen our award-winning book about Watkins Glen State Park?

Trees, Falls, and Trails

Episode 71 of Walk in the Park, our Ithaca, NY public access cable TV series 2017 Ithaca public access channel 13 cablecast schedule:

Saturday, March 25, 2017, 10:00 AM and 10:30 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Monday, 4:00 PM

Tuesday, 11:30 and 8:00 PM

Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 9:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Or you can watch it here ONLINE! (see below)

TFwinter2014_MrHeli4444.Still001

MrHeli4444’s view over the lip of Taughannock Falls from his remote controlled aerial device, featured in this episode of Walk in the Park.

This time, we learn about the coming assault on ash trees in our forests by the invasive beetle, the emerald ash borer, and what we can do to insure the long-term survival of ash tree species. You can watch this short segment separately at “Responding to the Emerald Ash Borer Invasion.”

Then we look at Taughannock Falls State Park in different times in history through photographs. This is followed by a spectacular aerial video around the top of the great falls itself. Thanks to Steve Knapp of Keuka View Photography and Bill Hecht for some of the photos in this segment, and to MrHeli4444 for the video.

Finally, we look at the dangers involved in hiking on closed trails in our state parks this spring before residual winter ice conditions and rockfall hazards have been dealt with and the trails declared open.

Watch the show now here!

Walk in the Park is a public access TV series in Ithaca, NY. Check for times and channels.

Saving Our Hemlock Forests

In episode 70 of Walk in the Park, we look at the attack by an invasive insect on our eastern hemlock trees in our forests and gorges and we find out what is being done in response. The schedule for cablecasts is below, along with the show online. And see the appeal for volunteers below!

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned.  If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component in our forests, particularly in our gorges.

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned. If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component in our forests, particularly in our gorges.

We join Cornell forest entomologist Mark Whitmore in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area in the City of Ithaca, NY, in the watershed for the water supply for the city. Mark explains and illustrates how the hemlock woolly adelgid, an aphid-like invasive insect, is killing the hemlock, a “keystone species” in our forests, and what larger impacts this has in our forest and stream ecosystems. But it’s not hopeless. Mark explains the biological controls that are being implemented to save at least some of our trees and set the stage for our forests’ recovery from this disaster over the long term. See how YOU CAN HELP below.

We wrap up the show with two short, beautiful videos of Taughannock Falls this winter and last.

This episode of the show will be cablecast beginning tonight (Thursday, February 26, 2015) at 9:00 on PEGASYS public access television channels 13 and 97.3 in the Ithaca area; and it will repeat on Saturday and Sunday (3/22-23) at 10:00 a.m. and the last scheduled cablecast will be next Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Or, you can watch it anytime ONLINE right here!

Note from 2/26/15 from Cayuga Lake Watershed Network: “Learn more about Hemlock Wooly Adelgid at a workshop/hike this Sunday March 1, from 12-2 at the Cayuga Nature Center (small entrance fee), or attend our Wells College campus workshop (free) on March 12 from 1-4 pm (rescheduled). Contact steward@cayugalake.org for more information.” https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cayuga-Lake-Watershed-Network/101436081850?fref=ts

For more information about hemlock woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer, and other invasive species threats to our lands, forests, and waters, please go to the New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Frozen Lakes and Waterfalls

Taughannock Falls State Park, Trumansburg, NY, on the west side of Cayuga Lake, ten miles north of Ithaca, NY, in the Finger Lakes region.

Taughannock Falls

Ice abounds from the Great Lakes to the Finger Lakes to the big waterfalls around Ithaca, NY. Join us as we explore these wonders from space, from the sky, and from the ground. Niagara Falls, Chimney Bluffs, Cayuga Lake, Taughannock Falls State Park, Ithaca Falls, Buttermilk Falls State Park, and Lucifer Falls in Robert H. Treman State Park, all near Ithaca. Why has our winter been so cold? Why don’t Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake normally freeze over while the other nine Finger Lakes do freeze? See big waterfalls trapped in ice. Many thanks for photographs from NASA, Steve Knapp of Keukaview Photography and the Penn Yan Flying Club, Bill Hecht,  Photography 4d, and Nigel Peter Benson Kent.
This episode 68 was recorded March 12, 2014 at PEGASYS public access studios in Ithaca, NY, part of our weekly series. See our regular schedule of cablecasts for this and other episodes for days and times.

Or, watch it online right here anytime!

 

Six Mile Creek, Trees and Water

Walk in the Park, episode 62, is now playing on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3)! Watch it Thursday night, 11/21/13, at 9:00, Saturday or Sunday at 10:30 a.m., or finally Tuesday, 11/26, at 8:00 p.m. Or here online!

Six Mile Creek has been the City of Ithaca’s water supply for more than 100 years. Two reservoir dams were built upstream in the watershed, but only the upper reservoir (“Third Dam” or “60-foot Dam”) now supplies municipal water. Join us as Roxy Johnston, the City’s Watershed Coordinator, takes us on a walk and talk tour in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area, telling us of the history of the watershed and the major rebuilding and renovation that is taking place now.

Construction of reservoir dam in Six Mile Creek watershed, Ithaca, NY Finger Lakes

In 1903, workers build one of the two dams in Six Mile Creek that have supplied the City of Ithaca's water supply. Photo courtesy of Roxy Johnston, City of Ithaca

We also join Mark Whitmore, forest entomologist from Cornell, as he explains the immense threats to our forests and our watershed from two invasive insects that attack major trees in our woodlands and gorges, including the eastern hemlock and all species of ash. Last episode, Whitmore explained the huge challenge forced upon us by the hemlock woolly adelgid, which we found in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area. This time, he addresses the emerald ash borer which is advancing toward us and will wipe out nearly all of our ash trees in our countryside and in town. Find out what we can do to respond to these inevitable assaults on our environment. [PLEASE NOTE: Late in the program, I mention, mistakenly, that there had been a report of the occurrence of emerald ash borer in Watkins Glen State Park. In fact, there is no record of any such report. My bad. Please ignore!]

Watch the show online here!

And, by the way, our popular book, ITHACA–THE CITY, GORGES, AND COLLEGES, is now out as an ebook. Check out the sample pages!

Digging up the Past

(Walk in the Park TV episode #60) Every fall, the Friends of Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY hold their Heritage Day in the upper park, with activities centered around the Old Mill and the ongoing archeology exploration of the former hamlet of Enfield Falls. Park visitors can go over to the dig and ask the archeologists what they are doing and what they are discovering. Prof. Sherene Baugher of Cornell University and her students in her archeology class now are unearthing the “Rumsey House,” occupied by the Rumsey family for over 60 years. We interview several of the students as they explain what they are finding, on this year’s Heritage Day on October 19, 2013.

The Old Mill in upper Robert H. Treman State Park near Ithaca, NY in the Finger Lakes region.

The Old Mill in upper Treman is the center of Heritage Day each fall. The mill is now closed for the season.

We also take a short walk on the Gorge Trail at Buttermilk Falls State Park after most leaves have fallen, and we look at apparently deformed trees. I explain the phenomenon in a short video.

Finally, we look at some photos of fall colors in the Sixmile Creek area in Ithaca, by Deanna Stickler Laurentz.

A yellow maple along the Gorge Trail in Buttermilk Falls State Park, autumn, fall colors, Ithaca, NY, Finger Lakes.

A sugar maple hangs on to its yellow autumn leaves along the Gorge Trail in Buttermilk Falls State Park.

Watch the show on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channel 13 (or 97.3), beginning this evening, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 at 9:00. See the rest of the schedule of showings over the next week.

Or you can watch it online anytime. Go directly to the YouTube post (perhaps for a little better video quality), or watch it right here. The best video quality will be the TV cablecast.

And, by the way, our popular book, ITHACA–THE CITY, GORGES, AND COLLEGES, is now out as an ebook. Check out the sample pages!

Land Trust Preserves and Monarch Butterflies

New England aster wildflower, Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve, Finger Lakes Land Trust, near Ithaca, NY in the Town of Dryden

New England aster at the entrance to the Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve near Ithaca, NY.

In episode 58 of Walk in the Park TV, we visit two Finger Lakes Land Trust Nature Preserves: Ellis Hollow Preserve in the Cascadilla Creek watershed east of Ithaca, NY and the Baldwin Tract of the Roy H. Park Preserve in the upper Sixmile Creek watershed between Dryden, NY and Slaterville Springs and next to Hammond Hill. While there, we take a close look at a monarch butterfly and consider its life cycle and reasons for its serious recent decline.

Watch this episode this week on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3) at the following schedule, or right here online!

Finger Lakes Land Trust Preserve and Trail Dedication

Episode 49 of Walk in the Park TV features the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s dedication of new lands, and a trail and boardwalk (“Howard’s Walk”) at the Roy H. Park Preserve in the Town of Dryden east of Ithaca, NY. Cablecasts continue on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channel 13 this Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and next Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. And, of course, you can watch it online below.

Finger Lakes Land Trust preserve, Tompkins County, Finger Lakes, NY

Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in the Town of Dryden, NY. Photo courtesy of Finger Lakes Land Trust

“This diverse, scenic, and inviting 217-acre preserve is a short drive from Ithaca, on the back roads of Dryden, and encompasses portions of an extensive forest, rolling meadows, wetlands, a rugged stretch of Six-Mile Creek along its headwaters. The preserve borders Yellow Barn State Forest, Hammond Hill State Forest, and the Cornell Old 600 Natural Area, making it an important connector in a larger array of some 8,000 acres of protected lands. The preserve adds another gem to the “Emerald Necklace,” the Land Trust’s initiative to create a continuous crescent of 50,000 acres of protected lands around Ithaca, and is the first major protected land linkage achieved under that initiative.” (See web page)

Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust east of Ithaca, NY and next to Hammond Hill State Forest of New York DEC, in the Town of Dryden.

New boardwalk dedicated on May 31, 2013, part of "Howard's Walk" at the Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust and Hammond Hill State Forest.

Our show features remarks by Andy Zepp, Executive Director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust, Martha Robertson, Chair of the Tompkins County Legislature, Ken Lynch, Director of Region 7 of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and Mary Ann Sumner, Town of Dryden Supervisor.

Waterfall at Buttermilk Falls State Park, Ithaca, NY

Buttermilk Falls State Park

The show continues with photos and video of the beauty of water in a gorge (Buttermilk Falls State Park), and the Cayuga Nation Picnic, part of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign this year.

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign Cayuga Lake canoe paddlers at the Cayuga Nation Picnic

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign Cayuga Lake canoe paddlers at the Cayuga Nation Picnic

And now, the show!

See all my episodes of Walk in the Park TV.

Fall Colors in the Finger Lakes

Episode 25 of Walk in the Park TV, “Fall Colors in the Finger Lakes,” is now showing on television and online. It begins Thursday evening at 9:00 p.m. on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 and continues for the next week according to the schedule below. Meanwhile, you can see “Fall Colors in the Finger Lakes” online.

Cornell University Fall Creek Gorge Cascadilla Ithaca NY Fall Colors aerial photograph

Most of the Cornell campus is bounded on the north and south by gorges: Fall Creek Gorge on the north (left) and Cascadilla Glen on the south (right). Photograph by Bill Hecht

Join me, Tony Ingraham, in this visual trip around the Finger Lakes region, from the ground and in the air, marveling at the fall foliage extravaganza nature has put on for us in October. Visit Taughannock Falls and Buttermilk Falls State Parks, Cascadilla Gorge, Ithaca Falls and Fall Creek Gorge, Cornell University campus, Cayuga Lake, Myers Park and Salmon Creek, Seneca County, Seneca Lake, Keuka Lake, Canandaigua Lake, Watkins Glen State Park, Sixmile Creek in Ithaca, and more. Photographer Bill Hecht’s views of Taughannock Gorge from the air are incomparable, as are his views of the Cornell campus situated between Fall Creek Gorge and Cascadilla Glen and other aerial vistas around the region. We also visit Cesar Chavez National Monument in California, Fishlake National Forest and Zion National Park in Utah, and Glacier National Park in Montana.

See the show right here!

Or, you can catch the show on Time Warner Cable public access television channel 13 in the Ithaca area:

Thursday,  9:00 p.m.

Saturday, 10:00 a.m.

Sunday,    10:00 a.m.

Tuesday,    8:00 p.m.

It also is shown at other times as the station manager chooses.