Back into Fall

Walk in the Park episode 153. As autumn slips into winter, we take a look back at some of our fall foliage beauty in the Finger Lakes. Watch my 29-minute show here online anytime, or on Ithaca, NY area public access cable channel 13 at these times during 2017:

9 PM Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017

10 AM Saturday and 10 AM  Sunday

8 PM Tuesday, Oct. 17

We visit Buttermilk Falls State Park; Connecticut Hill Wildlife Management Area, the Martin Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust; Canandaigua Lake, the Hi Tor Wildlife Management Area, Bare Hill, South Hill, and Vine Valley; the east shore of Cayuga Lake from Union Springs and Frontenac Island to Lansing and finally Ithaca. Then we switch to Corpus Christi Texas to explore two natural areas: the Oso Bay Wetlands Preserve and the South Texas Botanical Garden and Nature Center. See the photos of our encounter with a western diamondback rattlesnake!

Walk in the Park is produced for public access television at PEGASYS Studio of Time Warner Cable in Ithaca, NY by Tony Ingraham. Owl Gorge Productions

Park Minute 65: Autumn Over Canandaigua Lake

An aerial trip along the east side of Canandaigua Lake, featuring Conklin Gully in Hi Tor State Wildlife Management Area, Naples, NY; Great Hill, aka South Hill, with its Finger Lakes Land Trust preserve; Bare Hill and the Bare Hill State Unique Area; and Vine Valley. Aerial photography by Bill Hecht.

Park Minute 65. Park Minute is produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions in Ithaca, NY. See all of my Park Minutes .

 

 

 

Fall and Falls

We begin this episode of Walk in the Park (149) with Heritage Day in upper Robert H. Treman State Park. Then we look at fall colors in the upper gorge and Lucifer Falls, attend the dedication of the new park entrance area at Ithaca Falls, and visit the Martin Nature Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in Schuyler County.

You can watch it on Ithaca, NY public access cable channel 13 at these times in 2017:

9:00 PM Thursday, October 6, 2017

10:00 AM Saturday and Sunday, October  & 8

8:00 PM Tuesday, October 10, 2017

And you can stream it online anytime right here:


Walk in the Park is a weekly public access TV show on cable channel 13 in Ithaca, NY, produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, at PEGASYS Studios of Time Warner Cable.
Take a look at my national award-winning book about Watkins Glen State Park, A WALK THROUGH WATKINS GLEN: WATER’S SCULPTURE IN STONE.

Shindagin Hollow

Shindagin Hollow State Forest’s 5,266 acres make it five times larger than any of the several state parks in the Ithaca, NY area. In this episode (146) of Walk in the Park, we take a walk along the Finger Lakes Trail in Shindagin Hollow to its lovely little lean-to perched above the ravine of Shindagin Creek. We also look at the unusual balsam fir forest in Shindagin. And we take a broader look at Shindagin’s proximity to the great divide between north-flowing and south-flowing waterways, separating those that flow to the St. Lawrence River from those that head south in the Susquehanna River to the Chesapeake Bay. Finally, we look at the ongoing effects of severe drought in the Finger Lakes region.

You can watch this half-hour episode right here (below), and you can catch it on Ithaca, NY cable channel 13 at these times for the 2017 cablecasts:

9:00 PM August 31, 2017 (Thursday)

2:30 PM Friday, September 1

10:00 AM  and 10:30 PM, Saturday, September 2

10:00 AM and 7:30 PM, Sunday, September 3

2:30 PM, Monday, September 4

8:00 PM September 5 (Tuesday)

9:30 PM, Wednesday, September 6

Walk in the Park is produced in Ithaca, NY at PEGASYS pubic access TV studio of Time Warner Cable by Tony Ingraham of Owl Gorge Productions (Take a look at our books about the area on our website!).

Six Mile Source

In this episode (#136) of Walk in the Park, we take a two-mile hike at the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s Roy H. Park Preserve and Hammond Hill State Forest in Dryden, looking at the works of beavers and the changing forest near the headwaters of Six Mile Creek, the City of Ithaca’s water supply. But first we swing from a rope on the cliffs of Watkins Glen State Park with one of its “scalers.” And we walk the street in Ithaca’s Streets Alive Festival. And we are pleased to learn of the creation of the Harriet Tubman Home National Historical Park in Auburn. And finally, we look at a few of the trees and wildflowers along the creek in Buttermilk Falls State Park in Ithaca, NY.

You can watch this episode on Ithaca cable channel 13 (and 97.1) beginning 9 PM tonight (Thursday, May 5, 2016) and repeating Saturday and Sunday at 10 AM and finally 8 PM Tuesday, May 10, 2016.

Or you can watch it right here anytime, anywhere!

Walk in the Park is produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, for cablecast on public access television in Ithaca, NY, May 5, 2016.

Land Trust Preserves and Monarch Butterflies

New England aster wildflower, Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve, Finger Lakes Land Trust, near Ithaca, NY in the Town of Dryden

New England aster at the entrance to the Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve near Ithaca, NY.

In episode 58 of Walk in the Park TV, we visit two Finger Lakes Land Trust Nature Preserves: Ellis Hollow Preserve in the Cascadilla Creek watershed east of Ithaca, NY and the Baldwin Tract of the Roy H. Park Preserve in the upper Sixmile Creek watershed between Dryden, NY and Slaterville Springs and next to Hammond Hill. While there, we take a close look at a monarch butterfly and consider its life cycle and reasons for its serious recent decline.

Watch this episode this week on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3) at the following schedule, or right here online!

Finger Lakes Land Trust Preserve and Trail Dedication

Episode 49 of Walk in the Park TV features the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s dedication of new lands, and a trail and boardwalk (“Howard’s Walk”) at the Roy H. Park Preserve in the Town of Dryden east of Ithaca, NY. Cablecasts continue on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channel 13 this Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and next Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. And, of course, you can watch it online below.

Finger Lakes Land Trust preserve, Tompkins County, Finger Lakes, NY

Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in the Town of Dryden, NY. Photo courtesy of Finger Lakes Land Trust

“This diverse, scenic, and inviting 217-acre preserve is a short drive from Ithaca, on the back roads of Dryden, and encompasses portions of an extensive forest, rolling meadows, wetlands, a rugged stretch of Six-Mile Creek along its headwaters. The preserve borders Yellow Barn State Forest, Hammond Hill State Forest, and the Cornell Old 600 Natural Area, making it an important connector in a larger array of some 8,000 acres of protected lands. The preserve adds another gem to the “Emerald Necklace,” the Land Trust’s initiative to create a continuous crescent of 50,000 acres of protected lands around Ithaca, and is the first major protected land linkage achieved under that initiative.” (See web page)

Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust east of Ithaca, NY and next to Hammond Hill State Forest of New York DEC, in the Town of Dryden.

New boardwalk dedicated on May 31, 2013, part of "Howard's Walk" at the Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust and Hammond Hill State Forest.

Our show features remarks by Andy Zepp, Executive Director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust, Martha Robertson, Chair of the Tompkins County Legislature, Ken Lynch, Director of Region 7 of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and Mary Ann Sumner, Town of Dryden Supervisor.

Waterfall at Buttermilk Falls State Park, Ithaca, NY

Buttermilk Falls State Park

The show continues with photos and video of the beauty of water in a gorge (Buttermilk Falls State Park), and the Cayuga Nation Picnic, part of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign this year.

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign Cayuga Lake canoe paddlers at the Cayuga Nation Picnic

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign Cayuga Lake canoe paddlers at the Cayuga Nation Picnic

And now, the show!

See all my episodes of Walk in the Park TV.

Some Winter Walks Near Ithaca

This episode (#35, recorded January 23, 2013) of Walk in the Park TV features a hike in the red pine forest on the Finger Lakes Trail in Danby State Forest south of Ithaca, NY; a stroll on the paths through the sculpture gardens in the F. R. Newman Arboretum of Cornell Plantations; walking the East Ithaca Recreation Way and the East Ithaca Nature Preserve; and finally a wintry look at Lucifer Falls from the Rim Trail in Robert H. Treman State Park. We also look at some photographs of Buttermilk Falls in the 1800s when a saw mill stood beside the waterfall. See it here below or watch it on Ithaca’s public access TV channel 13; next cablecasts: Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., Tuesday at 8:00 p.m.

Copyright 2013 Owl Gorge Productions

Paper birch at Cornell Plantations, Ithaca, NY

Paper birch (Betula papyrifera) in the F.R. Newman Arboretum at Cornell Plantations

Watch the whole show here!

You can see all Walk in the Park TV episodes and short videos here.

 

Forest, Garden, Trail, Gorge

Highlights from this week’s upcoming Walk in the Park TV public access TV show on Ithaca, NY cable channel 13. See brief video below for times. First showing Thursday, 1/24 at 9:00 p.m. I will also post it online on this blog as soon as possible!

Hiking on the Finger Lakes Trail in Danby State Forest near Ithaca, NY, Finger Lakes.

Hikers walk through a red pine plantation on the Finger Lakes Trail in Danby State Forest. Photo by S. Hesse.

Ponds at Newman Arboretum, Cornell Plantations, Ithaca, NY.

Late afternoon sun reflects off ponds in Newman Arboretum in the Cornell Plantations, Ithaca, NY.

Deer buck rub in East Ithaca Nature Preserve, Ithaca, NY near Cornell University.

A "buck rub" in the East Ithaca Nature Preserve

Lucifer Falls at Robert H. Treman State Park, Ithaca, NY, in winter

Lucifer Falls in Robert H. Treman State Park as viewed from the Rim Trail

See the schedule for Ithaca public access TV channel 13 showings:

This episode will appear on this blog online soon!

Jobs in Parks

For the second year, I was asked to come to DeWitt Middle School in Ithaca to be a speaker during their “Looking to the Future Day,” their annual career day for 8th grade students. So, on November 30, I used my Powerpoint to explain the broad range of parks, preserves, and similar sites and organizations where one might pursue a career in “Parks and Recreation.” After fumbling for several minutes with wires, I hooked up a lapel mike to myself and started my video camera and recorded my talk for Walk in the Park TV (episode 31). Later, I exported all the Powerpoint slides as jpegs and then imported them into my video editor to illustrate my talk. 95% of the show is the slides with my voice beneath, while I navigate across each image on the screen as I discuss the topic. This is essentially a version of a talk I gave at Wells College last winter. You may find it interesting. It also is being shown on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13, with airings scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday, each day at 10:30 a.m., and finally on Tuesday at 8:00 p.m., though the station manager does show it at other times as well.

Below is my description of my talk for the students when they signed up for it:

Mary is a bookkeeper, Doug is a carpenter, Jane is a Jack-of-all-trades, Mike likes working with people, Brittany loves hiking, Sam loves landscaping, Jody loves kids, and Jorge is interested in law enforcement. Which among them could find a satisfying career in parks and recreation?

All of them.

It takes a broad team of professions to run a park, or a park system. Parks are natural places, but parks serve people. Every park has to strike a balance between preserving nature and making it accessible, safe, and enjoyable for the public. There is a career for you in parks and recreation, whether you are purchasing land, making a landscape plan, mowing lawns, or training staff; or constructing and maintaining park trails, roads, campgrounds, buildings, swimming areas, boat launches and marinas, golf courses, and playgrounds; or conducting nature education activities, running a concert series, staffing a recreation center, designing publications and exhibits; or managing a payroll, personnel records, grant writing, or secretarial and administrative work. If you want to be a biologist, geologist, historian, or biological technician, there are jobs in parks and recreation.