Robert H. Treman State Park: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

In this episode (164) of Walk in the Park, Jim Brophy, Park Manager for Robert H. Treman State Park, gives us a summary of the history of the park, some of the recent projects and accomplishments, and some of the cool plans for the future of this jewel of place. His presentation was on March 30, 2017 at the History Center of Tompkins County in Ithaca, NY and was part of the annual meeting of the Friends of Robert H. Treman State Park. The show is watchable online here, below, and will be cablecast on Ithaca public access TV channel 13 at the times listed here.

Thursday, 12:30 and 9:00 PM, April 13

Friday, 1:00 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 8:30 PM

Monday, 9:00 AM

Tuesday, 8:00 PM, April 18

Additional cablecasts will be added to this schedule soon.

Walk in the Park is produced at PEGASYS Studio of Spectrum TV in Ithaca, NY, by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, publisher of the national-award-winning book, A Walk Through Watkins Glen: Water’s Sculpture in Stone.

 

Four Centuries at Taughannock Falls

Join us on a journey for more than four hundred years of history at Taughannock Falls State Park in Trumansburg, NY, ten miles north of Ithaca, in the Finger Lakes region. One of the highest waterfalls in the eastern United States, Taughannock is taller than Niagara and has been an attraction since before the Civil War.

My beautiful picture

Guests staying the Taughannock House pose at the overlook nearby. The Taughannock House was a tourist hotel once located where the Falls Overlook parking lot is located today in Taughannock Falls State Park.

This show is viewable online on this page below and on Ithaca, NY’s PEGASYS public access cable TV channel 13 (and 97.3) on Saturday and Sunday (3/1 & 3/2 2014) at 10:30 a.m. and finally on Tuesday, 3/4 at 8:00 p.m.

Narrator Tony Ingraham will take you from Cayuga and Iroquois Indian towns at Taughannock Falls, on the west shore of Cayuga Lake, to war with Lenape or Delaware Indians, to the Revolutionary War and the Sullivan Campaign invasion, to early settlers, steamboats, a railroad, tourist hotels, and finally to the creation of Taughannock Falls State Park. The park has its own history, with Civilian Conservation Corps work, floods, park planning, construction, and expansion, summer concerts, and interpretive exhibits. Join us on this journey through time at a singularly scenic location in New York’s beautiful Finger Lakes region.
Episode 69 of Walk in the Park, a public access TV series in Ithaca, NY.

Iroquois Thanksgiving Address

We gather with family and friends today to give thanks for all that we are grateful for. One of the most beautiful, whole, and comprehensive givings of thanks I’ve heard is that of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois); their Thanksgiving Address is better described by the Iroquois Indian Museum than by me:

“The Ohen:ton Karihwatehkwen means ‘The Words That Come Before All Else.’  It is also referred to as ‘The Thanksgiving Address,’  ‘Giving Greetings to the Natural World,’ or ‘The Opening Address.’ Traditional Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) say these words to begin and end each day, important meetings, ceremonies, and socials.   The Ohen:ton Karihwatehkwen is an expression of acknowledgement, greetings, love, and appreciation for every part of the Natural World.  The Ohen:ton Karihwatehkwen helps to bring the thoughts of the people together.  It is a way by which the Haudenosaunee remind themselves that human beings are only one strand in the Web of Life and that we are all connected to each other and to the rest of Creation.”

I feel that this thanksgiving has vital meaning for all of us who now occupy “Turtle Island,” the lands of the original people of North America. Perhaps these profoundly beautiful words from those who have lived here long before the rest of us can rise up through us from this ancient ground and help us live right with each other and with this land. They have as much meaning for all of us now as they have had at any time. Indeed, our future depends on thoughts such as these.

“Below is a video presentation featuring Mohawk storyteller Kay Olan’s spoken version of the Thanksgiving Address along with images created by Tuscarora graphic artist Melanie Printup Hope supplemented with additional photographs.”

I post this with the approval of the Iroquois Indian Museum. They ask that we please visit their website and support their museum by donating or becoming a member.

“We are a private non-profit with no line items or support from the government and can use all the help we can get.”

[By the way, if the embedded video below does not show up on your device (e.g., I don’t see it on my iPad; maybe because it is flash), just click on the link below to go to the original location on the Museum’s website.]

Check here for the original web location of this video.

 

 

First People’s Festival, DeWitt Park

In episode 59 of Walk in the Park, we go to DeWitt Park in downtown Ithaca, NY for the annual First People’s Festival on October 5, 2013, held alongside the Ithaca Apple Harvest Festival. It continues to show this Saturday and Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3). See the full schedule of showings for the next week. Or, you can watch it online on this page below!

First Peoples Festival, DeWitt Park, Ithaca, NY, Ithaca College, Haudenosaunee, Iroquois

A Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) banner hangs behind information tables at the First Peoples Festival on Oct. 5, 2013 in Ithaca, NY's DeWitt Park.

The high point of our visit is an interview with Brandon Lazore of the Onondaga Nation of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), the artist who painted the wampum belt mural on the side of the Seneca Street garage in downtown Ithaca. We also interview Tariq Widarso, an Ithaca College student who has been working with the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign, which seeks to revive Native American treaties and care for our environment. And we also talk with Laura Kerrigan of Primitive Pursuits, who explains some Native American traditional skills they were teaching at the festival.

Finally, we take a couple of walks into Buttermilk Glen in Buttermilk Falls State Park; and we marvel at beautiful photographs by Roger C. Ingraham, who loves to study the nature of light reflected from water, particularly during the fall color season.

Episode 59 was recorded 10/9/13 at PEGASYS Studios in Ithaca, NY

A Scenic Tour of Ithaca, NY

Buttermilk Falls State Park as seen from Bostwick Rd. in the Town of Ithaca, NY in New York's Finger Lakes region.

Buttermilk Falls State Park as seen from a farm along Bostwick Road on West Hill in the Town of Ithaca

In this week’s new episode of Walk in the Park (#57) I take you on a scenic tour from Cayuga Lake to the hills around the Town of Ithaca. We pass waterfalls, parks, vistas over the valley, take a short walk in a nature preserve, pass through farms, cross creeks, and take in sweeping views of hills, gorges, valleys, and Cayuga Lake.

The Town of Ithaca Conservation Board has produced a scenic view brochure which you can get at the Ithaca Town Hall at the corner of Buffalo and Tioga Streets in the city or at the Tompkins County Visitor Center on East Shore Drive at the southeast corner of Cayuga Lake. Or you can download a pdf copy of the map and guide.

But the best way to learn about the scenic views in Ithaca is to take a virtual tour with me in this week’s show. It premiers tonight at 9:00 on Ithaca’s public access cable channel 13 (or 97.3) and will repeat this weekend at 10:30 a.m. both Saturday and Sunday. The final scheduled showing will be next Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 8:00 p.m.  Find out more about Walk in the Park TV.

OR YOU CAN WATCH IT RIGHT HERE!

Finger Lakes Land Trust Preserve and Trail Dedication

Episode 49 of Walk in the Park TV features the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s dedication of new lands, and a trail and boardwalk (“Howard’s Walk”) at the Roy H. Park Preserve in the Town of Dryden east of Ithaca, NY. Cablecasts continue on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channel 13 this Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and next Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. And, of course, you can watch it online below.

Finger Lakes Land Trust preserve, Tompkins County, Finger Lakes, NY

Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in the Town of Dryden, NY. Photo courtesy of Finger Lakes Land Trust

“This diverse, scenic, and inviting 217-acre preserve is a short drive from Ithaca, on the back roads of Dryden, and encompasses portions of an extensive forest, rolling meadows, wetlands, a rugged stretch of Six-Mile Creek along its headwaters. The preserve borders Yellow Barn State Forest, Hammond Hill State Forest, and the Cornell Old 600 Natural Area, making it an important connector in a larger array of some 8,000 acres of protected lands. The preserve adds another gem to the “Emerald Necklace,” the Land Trust’s initiative to create a continuous crescent of 50,000 acres of protected lands around Ithaca, and is the first major protected land linkage achieved under that initiative.” (See web page)

Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust east of Ithaca, NY and next to Hammond Hill State Forest of New York DEC, in the Town of Dryden.

New boardwalk dedicated on May 31, 2013, part of "Howard's Walk" at the Roy H. Park Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust and Hammond Hill State Forest.

Our show features remarks by Andy Zepp, Executive Director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust, Martha Robertson, Chair of the Tompkins County Legislature, Ken Lynch, Director of Region 7 of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and Mary Ann Sumner, Town of Dryden Supervisor.

Waterfall at Buttermilk Falls State Park, Ithaca, NY

Buttermilk Falls State Park

The show continues with photos and video of the beauty of water in a gorge (Buttermilk Falls State Park), and the Cayuga Nation Picnic, part of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign this year.

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign Cayuga Lake canoe paddlers at the Cayuga Nation Picnic

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign Cayuga Lake canoe paddlers at the Cayuga Nation Picnic

And now, the show!

See all my episodes of Walk in the Park TV.