Scenic Tour of Ithaca

In this week’s encore episode of Walk in the Park (#57) from 2013, I take you on a scenic tour from Cayuga Lake to the hills around the Town of Ithaca. We pass waterfalls, parks, vistas over the valley, take a short walk in a nature preserve, pass through farms, cross creeks, and take in sweeping views of hills, gorges, valleys, and Cayuga Lake. You can watch it on this page anytime, or on Ithaca, NY area’s public access TV cable channel 13 at the following times:

Thursday, Nov. 23, 9:00 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM and 7:30 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 8:30 PM

Monday, 6:00 PM

Tuesday, 8:00 PM

Wednesday, Nov. 29, 1:00 PM

Walk in the Park is a 30-minute, weekly public access TV series in Ithaca, NY produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, at PEGASYS Studio.

Flash Floods!

In this episode 172 of Walk in the Park, we visit local gorges and Cayuga Lake to look at flash floods last week in the context of sub-watersheds of Cayuga Lake: at Ithaca Falls, Six Mile Creek, Buttermilk Falls, Robert H. Treman State Park, Taughannock Falls, Yawger Creek, and the Ithaca Mall! We finish off with a series of photographs of blooming mountain laurel in Ricketts Glen State Park in northern Pennsylvania.

You can watch this episode online below, and on Ithaca, NY cable TV channel 13 at the following times:

Thursday, July 19, 2017, 9:00 PM

Friday, 6:30 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 7:30 PM

Monday, 1:30 PM

Tuesday, 8:00 PM

Wednesday, July 26, 1:00 PM

And online right here anytime!

Featuring the aerial videography of Joe Scaglione III, the videography of Jenny Renee Burun-Stout, videography from Robert H. Treman State Park staff, the photography of Fernando Llosa, the photography and videography of Tony Ingraham, and the aerial photography of Bill Hecht.

Walk in the Park is a weekly public access television series produced in Ithaca, NY at PEGASYS Studio, by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions.

Climate Warrior!

This week’s episode of Walk in the Park (#113) features a short video of “Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez, who was raised in the Aztec tradition, [who] spoke earnestly to the United Nations General Assembly June 29 challenging the representatives to make ‘great decisions,’ and take immediate action on climate change.” (Indian Country Today Media Network.com). Referred by Ganondagan State Historic Site in Victor, NY, the only state historic site in New York dedicated to the interpretation of Native American history and culture. Ganondagan will have its grand opening of its new visitor center and museum in October.

Watch this episode here anytime or on Ithaca, NY Time Warner Cable channels 13 & 97.1 beginning Thursday, 8/27/15 at 9 PM and again on Saturday and Sunday at 10 AM, and finally on Tuesday at 8 PM. Find out more about Walk in the Park on TV.

In this episode, we also enjoy another “Park Minute” called “Rounding a Rock at Six Mile Creek” in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area in Ithaca, NY. And singer-songwriters Susan Lytle and Will Fudeman entertain us with a performance of “Break Down” at Buttermilk Falls State Park. And in another “Glimpse of Nature,” we stand near Ithaca Falls in the golden light near the end of the day.
Also, we watch an Aircrane helicopter make two water drops over a forest fire in Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks in California, and discuss the relationship between the unprecedented western fires and climate change.
Finally, we watch a 30-second time-lapse video of sunrise over Ithaca, NY from Cass Park, filmed by Joe Scaglione III of Ithaca.

Walk in the Park is a public access television series in Ithaca, NY, produced at PEGASYS studios and cablecast on local Time Warner Cable channels 13 & 97.1. See all of our episodes.
See the schedule for all PEGASYS programming in Ithaca.
Or see all of our videos on YouTube

Produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, Ithaca, NY. Copyright 2015. Take a look at our books!

 

Flash Flood!

A flash flood ripped through gorges in the southern Finger Lakes New York on Sunday, June 14, 2015. In this episode (107) of Walk in the Park, we focus on damage done in the upper portion of Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY. We also look at flood waters at Buttermilk Falls State Park and Watkins Glen State Park and at a tornado that damaged the campground at Watkins Glen State Park. Finally we look at odd boulders transported by glaciers during the Ice Age, around Ithaca and a three other parks around the United States.

Walk in the Park is cablecast on Ithaca TV channels 13 and 97.3 on Thursday at 9 PM, Saturday and Sunday a 10 AM, and finally on Tuesday at 8 PM.

Or you can watch it right here anytime below

Produced by Owl Gorge Productions at PEGASYS studios in Ithaca, NY, the public access TV station operated by Time Warner Cable in Ithaca.
Have you seen our award-winning book about Watkins Glen State Park?

Saving Our Hemlock Forests

In episode 70 of Walk in the Park, we look at the attack by an invasive insect on our eastern hemlock trees in our forests and gorges and we find out what is being done in response. The schedule for cablecasts is below, along with the show online. And see the appeal for volunteers below!

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned.  If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component in our forests, particularly in our gorges.

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned. If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component in our forests, particularly in our gorges.

We join Cornell forest entomologist Mark Whitmore in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area in the City of Ithaca, NY, in the watershed for the water supply for the city. Mark explains and illustrates how the hemlock woolly adelgid, an aphid-like invasive insect, is killing the hemlock, a “keystone species” in our forests, and what larger impacts this has in our forest and stream ecosystems. But it’s not hopeless. Mark explains the biological controls that are being implemented to save at least some of our trees and set the stage for our forests’ recovery from this disaster over the long term. See how YOU CAN HELP below.

We wrap up the show with two short, beautiful videos of Taughannock Falls this winter and last.

This episode of the show will be cablecast beginning tonight (Thursday, February 26, 2015) at 9:00 on PEGASYS public access television channels 13 and 97.3 in the Ithaca area; and it will repeat on Saturday and Sunday (3/22-23) at 10:00 a.m. and the last scheduled cablecast will be next Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Or, you can watch it anytime ONLINE right here!

Note from 2/26/15 from Cayuga Lake Watershed Network: “Learn more about Hemlock Wooly Adelgid at a workshop/hike this Sunday March 1, from 12-2 at the Cayuga Nature Center (small entrance fee), or attend our Wells College campus workshop (free) on March 12 from 1-4 pm (rescheduled). Contact steward@cayugalake.org for more information.” https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cayuga-Lake-Watershed-Network/101436081850?fref=ts

For more information about hemlock woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer, and other invasive species threats to our lands, forests, and waters, please go to the New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Frozen Lakes and Waterfalls

Taughannock Falls State Park, Trumansburg, NY, on the west side of Cayuga Lake, ten miles north of Ithaca, NY, in the Finger Lakes region.

Taughannock Falls

Ice abounds from the Great Lakes to the Finger Lakes to the big waterfalls around Ithaca, NY. Join us as we explore these wonders from space, from the sky, and from the ground. Niagara Falls, Chimney Bluffs, Cayuga Lake, Taughannock Falls State Park, Ithaca Falls, Buttermilk Falls State Park, and Lucifer Falls in Robert H. Treman State Park, all near Ithaca. Why has our winter been so cold? Why don’t Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake normally freeze over while the other nine Finger Lakes do freeze? See big waterfalls trapped in ice. Many thanks for photographs from NASA, Steve Knapp of Keukaview Photography and the Penn Yan Flying Club, Bill Hecht,  Photography 4d, and Nigel Peter Benson Kent.
This episode 68 was recorded March 12, 2014 at PEGASYS public access studios in Ithaca, NY, part of our weekly series. See our regular schedule of cablecasts for this and other episodes for days and times.

Or, watch it online right here anytime!

 

Six Mile Creek, Trees and Water

Walk in the Park, episode 62, is now playing on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3)! Watch it Thursday night, 11/21/13, at 9:00, Saturday or Sunday at 10:30 a.m., or finally Tuesday, 11/26, at 8:00 p.m. Or here online!

Six Mile Creek has been the City of Ithaca’s water supply for more than 100 years. Two reservoir dams were built upstream in the watershed, but only the upper reservoir (“Third Dam” or “60-foot Dam”) now supplies municipal water. Join us as Roxy Johnston, the City’s Watershed Coordinator, takes us on a walk and talk tour in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area, telling us of the history of the watershed and the major rebuilding and renovation that is taking place now.

Construction of reservoir dam in Six Mile Creek watershed, Ithaca, NY Finger Lakes

In 1903, workers build one of the two dams in Six Mile Creek that have supplied the City of Ithaca's water supply. Photo courtesy of Roxy Johnston, City of Ithaca

We also join Mark Whitmore, forest entomologist from Cornell, as he explains the immense threats to our forests and our watershed from two invasive insects that attack major trees in our woodlands and gorges, including the eastern hemlock and all species of ash. Last episode, Whitmore explained the huge challenge forced upon us by the hemlock woolly adelgid, which we found in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area. This time, he addresses the emerald ash borer which is advancing toward us and will wipe out nearly all of our ash trees in our countryside and in town. Find out what we can do to respond to these inevitable assaults on our environment. [PLEASE NOTE: Late in the program, I mention, mistakenly, that there had been a report of the occurrence of emerald ash borer in Watkins Glen State Park. In fact, there is no record of any such report. My bad. Please ignore!]

Watch the show online here!

And, by the way, our popular book, ITHACA–THE CITY, GORGES, AND COLLEGES, is now out as an ebook. Check out the sample pages!

Gorge Tree Killer!

Walk in the Park TV episode 61

In the past few years, an alien invader has arrived in our forests in the Finger Lakes region, particularly in our gorges, and has begun to kill the eastern hemlock, one of our most beautiful species of trees. The culprit? A tiny, aphid-like insect called the “hemlock woolly adelgid.” It’s been found in Robert H. Treman State Park, it’s at Taughannock Falls, at Cornell Plantations, in Watkins Glen State Park, and at other sites.

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned. If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component of our forests, particularly in our gorges.

In this show, we join Mark Whitmore, forest entomologist at Cornell University, and the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network to look for this deadly invader from Asia in the Sixmile Creek Natural Area. Will we find it? What can be done about it? See the show to find out!

You can watch the show in the Ithaca, NY area on public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3). The first showing is tonight, Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 9:00. See the full schedule of showings.

Or watch it right here!

For more information on this and other invasive species in New York State, please visit the New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse website.

And, by the way, our popular book, ITHACA–THE CITY, GORGES, AND COLLEGES, is now out as an ebook. Check out the sample pages!

Land Trust Preserves and Monarch Butterflies

New England aster wildflower, Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve, Finger Lakes Land Trust, near Ithaca, NY in the Town of Dryden

New England aster at the entrance to the Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve near Ithaca, NY.

In episode 58 of Walk in the Park TV, we visit two Finger Lakes Land Trust Nature Preserves: Ellis Hollow Preserve in the Cascadilla Creek watershed east of Ithaca, NY and the Baldwin Tract of the Roy H. Park Preserve in the upper Sixmile Creek watershed between Dryden, NY and Slaterville Springs and next to Hammond Hill. While there, we take a close look at a monarch butterfly and consider its life cycle and reasons for its serious recent decline.

Watch this episode this week on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3) at the following schedule, or right here online!

Park Minute: Mother Nature Helped Heal 9-11

Lindsay-Parsons Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in West Danby NY south of Ithaca

The Lindsay Parsons Preserve of the Finger Lakes Land Trust in West Danby, NY south of Ithaca is a healing and inspiring landscape.

Today, as we remember that terrible day fifteen years ago, I have produced another Park Minute about the solace and healing that many sought in nature in parks upstate from New York City in the days and weeks following the horror in Manhattan.