Sampson State Park

We begin this episode (160) of Walk in the Park with a February look at Buttermilk Falls in Buttermilk Falls State Park, and Lucifer Falls in Robert H. Treman State Park. Then we go to Sampson State Park on the east shore of Seneca Lake in Seneca County, NY and visit the Sampson Military Museum, created by World War 2 veterans who trained at the Sampson Naval Training Center, and Korean War veterans who trained at Sampson Air Force Base. We review the Revolutionary War history of the site, and some of the history of the nearby former Seneca Army Depot, including the Women’s Peace Encampment in the 1980s that protested the nuclear arms race.

Watch it online below or on Ithaca area cable channel 13 at any of the following days and times:

Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, 9:00 PM

Friday, 3:30 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 8:30 PM

Monday, 1:00 PM

Tuesday, 8:00 PM

Wednesday, March 1, 1:00 PM


Sampson State Park is over 2,000 acres and has a two-mile undeveloped shoreline along Seneca Lake. It’s large campground has 309 sites, and has the most electric sites in the Finger Lakes State Parks, making it a favorite for RV campers.

Walk in the Park is a weekly public access TV show produced by Tony Ingraham at PEGASYS Studio in Ithaca, NY, as a public service of Owl Gorge Productions . Take a peek at Tony’s national-award-winning book about Watkins Glen State Park.

Taughannock Roars!

Thaw and heavy rain brought 215-feet-high Taughannock Falls to life, roaring with brown water on its way to Cayuga Lake. In this episode (#125) of Walk in the Park, we take a virtual walk up the gorge to the big show at the falls.

Watch it here online or on Ithaca, NY area cable TV channel 13 (and 97.1). First cablecast is 9 PM Thursday, January 14, 2016; then on Saturday and Sunday at 10 AM; finally at 8 PM Tuesday, January 19.

Then we go to Buttermilk Falls State Park and do another virtual walk on a loop around the Rim Trail, by the gorge of Buttermilk Glen. We also take a look at January deer hunting in the “Deer Management Focus Area” in Tompkins County. Finally, we report on the record January count of bald eagles at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge at the north end of Cayuga Lake in New York’s Finger Lakes region.
Produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions. Walk in the Park is our public access television series in Ithaca, NY, cablecast on channels 13 and 97.1. See all of our episodes and short videos on our vidblog.

Look at our national award winning book, A Walk Through Watkins Glen-Water’s Sculpture in Stone.

Ticking Lyme Bomb

getty_rm_photo_of_adult_and_nymph_tick

Adult and nymph deer tick

Lyme disease and its cousins have become epidemic in our part of the country. Most of us know someone, or may be someone, who has had Lyme. And now we are entering the most active season for us to be at risk for getting this terrible affliction.

In the spring of 2014, Ithaca area herbalist and educator Becca Harber gave a workshop at Greenstar Cooperative Market in Ithaca entitled, “Lyme Disease: Prevention and Care.” I videoed the workshop and separated it into three parts to show as a series in my weekly Ithaca public access TV show, Walk in the Park. Ithaca public access TV station, PEGASYS,

You can stream the three episodes here on this website anytime.

Part 1         Part 2        Part 3

Pdf files of handouts distributed at the beginning of the workshop are available on the page for Part 1.

 

Lyme Disease: Prevention & Care, Part 3

Part 3, on TV and online! (Below)

(You can watch all three parts of this series on Lyme disease here.)

Basic CMYK

In the final part of this three-part series about Lyme disease, herbalist and educator Becca Harber discusses co-infections associated with Lyme and tick bites, testing for Lyme disease, maintaining health, herbal medicine and Lyme, and the use of pesticides. Recorded at Greenstar Cooperative Market in Ithaca, NY on April 24, 2014. Handouts for this class are downloadable at the bottom of the page in our post for Part 1 of this series.

Part 3 will begin showing on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable TV channels 13 and 97.3 on Thursday, May 15 at 9:00 p.m.  Part 3 will show again on TV on Saturday and Sunday (May 17 & 18) at 10:30 a.m., and finally on Tuesday, May 20, at 8:00 p.m.

Or, you can watch Part 3 online right here anytime!

You can watch all three parts of this series on Lyme disease here.

Becca Harber is available to teach introductory workshops and class series on lyme disease to staff at schools, parents, organizations, etc. She has recently attended a weekend training on lyme disease with with Dr. Richard Horowitz, M.D., one of the most well-known lyme-literate doctors who’s treated 12,000+ people with lyme and associated tick-borne infections. He taught his new differential diagnostic approach to MSIDS (Multi-Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome, which can be used with any chronic disease. Becca has taught holistic health and herbal medicine starting in 1987 and since 2004, Collaborative (Nonviolent) Communication. Call 607-564-7051 (takes 7 rings for messaging).

Walk in the Park is produced by Owl Gorge Productions. See our ebooks: ITHACA, the CITY, GORGES and COLLEGES; the award-winning A WALK THROUGH WATKINS GLEN: WATER’S SCULPTURE IN STONE; and our new book TUX THE CAT and HIS EXOTIC EXPLOITS.

 

Lyme Disease: Prevention & Care, Part 2

Deer ticks are very small. From left to right, are a larva, nymph, an adult male, and an adult female. The nymph, only size of poppy seed, is particularly active from mid-spring through mid-summer and may be responsible for most Lyme infections.

Deer ticks are very small. From left to right, are a larva, a nymph, an adult male, and an adult female. The nymph (at the end of the arrow) is only size of poppy seed, and it is particularly active from mid-spring through mid-summer. Nymphs may be responsible for most Lyme infections.

In this episode (75), we continue Becca Harber’s class on Lyme disease. This time, she discusses treating tick bites, considerations about pets, tick repellents, and diagnosing Lyme disease. Handouts for the workshop are downloadable from our Part 1 post.

This episode of Walk in the Park is showing on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channels 13 and 97.3 on Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and finally next Tuesday, May 13, at 8:00 p.m. And, of course, you can watch it right here!

Walk in the Park is produced by Owl Gorge Productions.

Becca Harber is available to teach introductory workshops and class series on lyme disease to staff at schools, parents, organizations, etc. She has recently attended a weekend training on lyme disease with with Dr. Richard Horowitz, M.D., one of the most well-known lyme-literate doctors who’s treated 12,000+ people with lyme and associated tick-borne infections. He taught his new differential diagnostic approach to MSIDS (Multi-Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome, which can be used with any chronic disease. Becca has taught holistic health and herbal medicine starting in 1987 and since 2004, Collaborative (Nonviolent) Communication. Call 607-564-7051 (takes 7 rings for messaging).

Introduced Plants, Worms, and Deer

On February 25, 2013, Bernd Blossey, Associate Professor in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University, gave a talk at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology entitled, “How Introduced Plants, Worms, and Deer are Reshaping our Neighborhoods.”

Cornell ecologist Bernd Blossey sets a trail cam to record deer behavior in the recent PBS Nature episode "The Private Life of Deer." (Click on photo to see the program.)

Blossey is considered a world authority on the biological control of invasive species. His presentation radically changed many people’s ideas about things happening in our woods.

Some examples:

  • Though earthworms, which are not native, may benefit gardens and plowed agricultural soil, they are devastating to the leaf litter and humus of the forest floor, compacting the soil and causing serious soil erosion, leading to the loss of many native plants, amphibians, and invertebrates.
  • Garlic mustard, one of the best-known invasive plants in our eastern forests, and which many people spend hours weeding from parks, preserves, and the woods around their homes, will not infest an area not already invaded by earthworms. (Blossey offers a $5000 reward for anyone who can find an exception to this!) Furthermore, Blossey says the research indicates that pulling up garlic mustard is a waste of time, as it eventually poisons the soil against itself; that pulling the plant actually delays this process and prolongs the presence of the plant; and that the presence of garlic mustard appears not to limit the success of native wildflowers such as trillium.
  • Deer overpopulation, however, does have an enormous impact on the health, biodiversity, and the very future of our forests. Blossey said that research on Cornell lands indicates that sterilization of females to reduce deer numbers is a huge waste of money (at $700 to $1000 per animal), as it is completely ineffective in reducing the overabundance of deer in “open populations.”

Prof. Blossey spoke of much more, including comparing the effects on amphibian populations from invasive plants and native plants in aquatic ecosystems.

When I went to the lecture, I had not planned to record it, but I changed my mind while there. I recorded it with the video function of my shirt pocket camera, finishing off with my iPhone when I ran out of card storage. The video quality is poor, especially the iPhone section, but the audio is acceptable. You can see Dr. Blossey’s slides in more than half of the presentation.  Perhaps think of it as a podcast with some visuals.

I decided to post Prof. Blossey’s talk because I feel much information in it is so new to most of us and challenges a number of the assumptions that many of us have about managing invasive species, one of the biggest environmental issues of our time.

Watch/listen right here:

Journey to Big Bend

In this episode of Walk in the Park TV (#46), Tony travels to Texas, first to visit Big Bend National Park along the Rio Grande in the Chihuahuan Desert and the Chisos Mountains of southwest Texas. See this episode on Ithaca, NY’s public access channel 13 (see the schedule below) or watch it right here on this page, below.

Chisos Mountains in Big Bend National Park, Texas

Chisos Mountains in Big Bend National Park, Texas

He also visits Historic Fort Stockton which was manned by African American “Buffalo Soldiers” following the Civil War, during the war against the Comanches, Apaches, and other Indian nations in the campaign to conquer the Southwest and secure the southernmost wagon train route to California.

Historic Fort Stockton, Texas

Historic Fort Stockton, Texas

Then Tony camps in the Texas Hill Country west of San Antonio, spending several days at the birdwatching hot spot South Llano River State Park in Junction, TX. There he sees many birds new to him, including the painted bunting, and has an encounter with a rattlesnake! See all the Walk in the Park TV episodes and more online here.

Painted Bunting in South Llano River State Park, Junction, Texas. Birding, bird watching.

Painted Bunting in South Llano River State Park, Junction, Texas

Watch the  half hour show right here….

Or catch it on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable TV channel 13 this Saturday and Sunday (April 27 & 28) at 10:30 a.m., and next Tuesday (April 30) at 8:00 p.m. The video quality on your TV will be better than in this online version.

 

The Treman Show

old postcard Enfield Falls State Park, Robert H. Treman State Park, Ithaca, NY, Finger Lakes

An old postcard shows the beginning of the upper gorge in the upper section of Robert H. Treman State Park.

“The Treman Show.” Produced by the Friends of Robert H. Treman State Park, this award-winning* half-hour episode of Walk in the Park TV (#44) explores the trails, history, archeology, geology, and plants and wildlife of this scenic and historic park near Ithaca in New York’s Finger Lakes region. It will show on Ithaca, NY’s public access channel 13 this Thursday at 9 PM,  Saturday and Sunday at 10:00 a.m., and again on Tuesday, May 19, 2015, at 8:00 p.m. Or, you can watch it right here anytime!

*This video, originally entitled, “Exploring Robert H. Treman State Park,” and part of the Nature Nearby series produced by Tony Ingraham for PEGASYS public access in Ithaca, NY, won first place as the best public access show in Ithaca in 2008.

Forest, Garden, Trail, Gorge

Highlights from this week’s upcoming Walk in the Park TV public access TV show on Ithaca, NY cable channel 13. See brief video below for times. First showing Thursday, 1/24 at 9:00 p.m. I will also post it online on this blog as soon as possible!

Hiking on the Finger Lakes Trail in Danby State Forest near Ithaca, NY, Finger Lakes.

Hikers walk through a red pine plantation on the Finger Lakes Trail in Danby State Forest. Photo by S. Hesse.

Ponds at Newman Arboretum, Cornell Plantations, Ithaca, NY.

Late afternoon sun reflects off ponds in Newman Arboretum in the Cornell Plantations, Ithaca, NY.

Deer buck rub in East Ithaca Nature Preserve, Ithaca, NY near Cornell University.

A "buck rub" in the East Ithaca Nature Preserve

Lucifer Falls at Robert H. Treman State Park, Ithaca, NY, in winter

Lucifer Falls in Robert H. Treman State Park as viewed from the Rim Trail

See the schedule for Ithaca public access TV channel 13 showings:

This episode will appear on this blog online soon!

January Thaw and Deer Hunting!

This week’s new Walk in the Park TV episode, is here online and on Ithaca, NY’s cable public access channel 13. Watch it tonight (Thursday, 1/17) at 9:00 p.m. or at one of the other times indicated below, or watch it below right here.

The snows of late December yielded to the thaw of early January around Ithaca, NY and the Finger Lakes region. Nowhere has it been more dramatically demonstrated than at roaring Ithaca Falls. We take a short video trip around the cataract from several perspectives to marvel at its power and beauty. Then we go for a walk on the Cayuga Waterfront Trail at Allan H. Treman State Marine Park in Ithaca along Cayuga Inlet and the ice-free shore of Cayuga Lake. And with the snow gone, we look into the gorge at Buttermilk Falls State Park.

But one has to be careful in the woods around Ithaca this January with the DEC’s experimental Deer Management Focus Area in central Tompkins County, where hunting of “antlerless” deer is permitted (with a permit) through the rest of the month. Special guest commentator, the backwoods curmudgeon philosopher Ichabod, sounds off about “Too Many Deer!” (The views and opinions expressed by this character are not necessarily those of this program, Channel 13, or Time Warner Cable!)

Too see this show online:

Episode 34 of the Ithaca, NY public access TV series, Walk in the Park, produced by Tony Ingraham. See all episodes online on my vidblog. Copyright 2013 Owl Gorge Productions.

See it on Ithaca’s cable channel 13:

Thursdays, 9:00 p.m.

Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.

Sunday’s, 10:30 a.m.

Tuesdays, 8:00 p.m.

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