Watkins Glen Resident Artist, Capt. James Hope, Part 1

From 1872 until his death in 1892, landscape artist Capt. James Hope had an art gallery next to the gorge of Watkins Glen. A lesser known figure of the Hudson River School of landscape painters, Hope captured the beauty of the glen on his canvases and realized his life’s dream of supporting himself and his family with his landscape art. Tony Ingraham tells the first half of this story in this episode of Walk in the Park (#130). Next episode will complete the tale. Tony originally gave this illustrated presentation in February to an audience at the Rockwell Museum in Corning, NY.

You can watch this episode on Ithaca, NY public access television channel 13 (and 97.1) according to the schedule below. Or you can watch it online anywhere, anytime right here!

Ithaca cable channel 13 (and 97.1) cablecasts of this episode (155) of Walk in the Park:

Walk130sched_crop

Produced by Tony Ingraham of Owl Gorge Productions at PEGASYS studios, Ithaca, NY

Hope Comes to Rainbow Falls, Watkins Glen

Walk in the Park episode 104, cablecasting on Ithaca, NY Time Warner Cable channels 13 and 97.3, beginning Thursday, May 21, 2015, 9:00 p.m.; continuing Saturday and Sunday at 10:00 a.m., and finally on Tuesday, May 26, at 8:00 p.m. Or watch it online anytime below!

Capt. James Hope was a 19th century Hudson River School landscape artist, best known for his Civil War paintings, who became the resident artist in Watkins Glen’s famous gorge for twenty years in the late 19th century. His first painting of Rainbow Falls sold for $10,000, a huge sum at the time. We follow his story as part of the larger story of Watkins Glen and the eventual state park. Find out what Mark Twain said about Rainbow Falls in 1871.

We also take a hike in nearby Finger Lakes National Forest, checking out the views, the forest, and some spring wildflowers.

See our richly-illustrated, national-award-winning book, A WALK THROUGH WATKINS GLEN: WATER’S SCULPTURE IN STONE.

Park Minute: Catskill Mountain Sunrise

Since the early 1800s, people have risen before dawn on the brink of the northeastern escarpment of New York’s Catskill Mountains to watch the sun rise over the Hudson River Valley. Here the Hudson River School of American art was born in the early 1800s, in the area near the former famous Catskill Mountain House.

See our full Walk in the Park episode, Catskill Sunrise.

See all of our Park Minutes.  And visit our Walk in the Park YouTube channel! (And subscribe!)

Sapsucker Cairn

What is it?           Where is it?

Sapsucker Woods, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, Andy Goldsworthy

The Sapsucker Cairn

The Sapsucker Cairn was constructed in 2008 by acclaimed environmental artist Andy Goldsworthy on the East Trail of Sapsucker Woods Sanctuary, the nature preserve of Cornell’s Laboratory of Ornithology in Ithaca, NY. Goldsworthy also created Gardens of Stone in Cornell Plantations. (See our Walk in the Park TV post about walking at the Newman Arboretum and the Gardens of Stone.)

Sapsucker Woods is a beautiful place to visit in any season. The 230-acre sanctuary encompasses forests, ponds, ferny swamps, and abundant wildlife. More than four miles of trails and boardwalks are waiting for you to explore.” You can pick up a great little trail map and bird checklist outside the entrance of the Johnson Visitor Center.

Sapsucker Woods, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, Ithaca NY, wetland, swamp, trail

Swamp in Sapsucker Woods

Boardwalk, Sapsucker Woods, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY

The Woodleton Boardwalk along the East Trail at Sapsucker Woods Sanctuary crosses a swampy area.

Swamp, wetland, trail, Sapsucker Woods, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY

The East Trail encircles a wooded swamp.