Park Minute: Catskill Mountain Sunrise

Since the early 1800s, people have risen before dawn on the brink of the northeastern escarpment of New York’s Catskill Mountains to watch the sun rise over the Hudson River Valley. Here the Hudson River School of American art was born in the early 1800s, in the area near the former famous Catskill Mountain House.

See our full Walk in the Park episode, Catskill Sunrise.

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Catskill Sunrise

Sunrise over the Hudson River Valley as seen from the site of the Catskill Mountain House on the brink of the Catskill escarpment. The Hudson River is visible in the right-center of the picture, more than 2000 feet below. The Catskill Mountain House was a luxury tourist hotel in the 19th century and the area was the epicenter of the birth of the Hudson River School of American landscape painting.

Sunrise over the Hudson River Valley as seen from the site of the Catskill Mountain House on the brink of the Catskill escarpment. The Hudson River is visible in the right-center of the picture, more than 2000 feet below. The Catskill Mountain House was a luxury tourist hotel in the 19th century and the area was the epicenter of the birth of the Hudson River School of American landscape painting.

In this episode, #85, of Walk in the Park, we travel to New York’s Catskill Mountains, to the northeast section of Catskill Park overlooking the Hudson River Valley. We camp at North Lake/South Lake Campground, go for a hike to North Point, and explore the history behind the site of the Catskill Mountain House and the Hudson River School of painting. And we finish with a visit to the nearby Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, NY, along the Hudson River and within sight of the Catskills.

You can watch the show right here online, and on Ithaca, NY cable channel 13. 2017 cablecast schedule:

9:00 PM, Thursday, September 28, 2017

10:00 AM, Saturday and Sunday

8:00 PM, Tuesday, October 3, 2017

And to watch an illustrated short video of this sunrise check out our Park Minute: Catskill Mountain Sunrise.

Walk in the Park is a public access weekly TV show recorded in PEGASYS Studios in Ithaca, NY. See all of our Walk in the Park episodes.

Walk in the Park is produced by Owl Gorge Productions, publisher of our national award-winning book about Watkins Glen State Park in New York’s Finger Lakes region, A WALK THROUGH WATKINS GLEN: WATER’S SCULPTURE IN STONE.

Kaaterskill

Kaaterskill Falls in New York's Catskill Mountains

Kaaterskill Falls, one of the tallest waterfalls in New York State, in the northeast Catskill Mountains

In this week’s episode (#48) of Walk in the Park TV, we visit the northeastern Catskill Mountains overlooking the Hudson River. It is the site of Washington Irving’s story of Rip Van Winkle, the former site of several 19th century luxury mountain resorts, and the birthplace of the Hudson River School of painting. We travel across the Hudson to Olana, the home of Frederic Church, one of the Hudson River School’s most famous and most successful artists. From Olana, we have a sweeping view of the “Catskill Mural Front.”

We finish the show with a look at a few of the wildflowers blooming now around our gorges.

Watch the show online below or see it this weekend on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channel 13 on both Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and then finally next Tuesday, June 4, at 8:00 p.m. (In general, video quality on the TV is better than online.)

Jobs in Parks

For the second year, I was asked to come to DeWitt Middle School in Ithaca to be a speaker during their “Looking to the Future Day,” their annual career day for 8th grade students. So, on November 30, I used my Powerpoint to explain the broad range of parks, preserves, and similar sites and organizations where one might pursue a career in “Parks and Recreation.” After fumbling for several minutes with wires, I hooked up a lapel mike to myself and started my video camera and recorded my talk for Walk in the Park TV (episode 31). Later, I exported all the Powerpoint slides as jpegs and then imported them into my video editor to illustrate my talk. 95% of the show is the slides with my voice beneath, while I navigate across each image on the screen as I discuss the topic. This is essentially a version of a talk I gave at Wells College last winter. You may find it interesting. It also is being shown on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13, with airings scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday, each day at 10:30 a.m., and finally on Tuesday at 8:00 p.m., though the station manager does show it at other times as well.

Below is my description of my talk for the students when they signed up for it:

Mary is a bookkeeper, Doug is a carpenter, Jane is a Jack-of-all-trades, Mike likes working with people, Brittany loves hiking, Sam loves landscaping, Jody loves kids, and Jorge is interested in law enforcement. Which among them could find a satisfying career in parks and recreation?

All of them.

It takes a broad team of professions to run a park, or a park system. Parks are natural places, but parks serve people. Every park has to strike a balance between preserving nature and making it accessible, safe, and enjoyable for the public. There is a career for you in parks and recreation, whether you are purchasing land, making a landscape plan, mowing lawns, or training staff; or constructing and maintaining park trails, roads, campgrounds, buildings, swimming areas, boat launches and marinas, golf courses, and playgrounds; or conducting nature education activities, running a concert series, staffing a recreation center, designing publications and exhibits; or managing a payroll, personnel records, grant writing, or secretarial and administrative work. If you want to be a biologist, geologist, historian, or biological technician, there are jobs in parks and recreation.