Falls and Lakes

On TV, and online right here!

In this episode (106) of Walk in the Park, we compare Buttermilk Falls in Ithaca before and during the recent heavy rain. Then we look at Hector Falls by Seneca Lake,  Ithaca Falls on Fall Creek, and then we’ll pop over to Owasco Lake, our Finger Lakes neighbor to the east. We’ll travel the length of the lake and visit parks at either end. Finally, we’ll start a discussion of “Grand Canyons” across America with a peek at the “Grand Canyon of Maine.”

Produced by Owl Gorge Productions  at PEGASYS Studios, Time Warner Cable, Ithaca, NY June 11, 2015. See the full schedule of Walk in the Park cablecasts.

See our wonderful books about Ithaca and Watkins Glen State Park.

Gulf Hagas, Grand Canyon of Maine

Those of us in the Finger Lakes region of New York are fascinated by our gorges. And, of course, the grandest gorge of all we are familiar with in America is the Grand Canyon. But some 36 states besides Arizona claim to have a “Grand Canyon” of their state or region of the country.

At the northeast extreme of the US is Gulf Hagas, the “Grand Canyon of Maine,” or the “Grand Canyon of the East,” though other states claim to have the same. Gulf Hagas is in the Appalachian Trail Corridor of the National Park Service, part of the “Hundred Mile Wilderness,” the longest stretch of wilderness along this more than 2,000 mile footpath on the Appalachian Mountain chain and near the end of the “AT” at Baxter State Park on Mount Katahdin.

Map of Maine showing Gulf Hagas

Gulf Hagas, Maine’s “Grand Canyon,” is in the wilderness of the mountains of central Maine along the Appalachian Trail. Source: Wikipedia

 

"The West Branch of the Pleasant River cuts through the earth for three miles creating a vertically walled slate gorge with numerous waterfalls. A trail follows the rim of the canyon offering hikers views of the falls and its geology. The gorge is 3 miles (4.8 km) long; the river drops 370 feet (110 m) in this distance boasting 130 feet (40 m) walls.[1] Gulf Hagas is one of 14 National Natural Landmarks in the State of Maine,[2] and is open to the public for a fee during the regular season." Wikimedia

“The West Branch of the Pleasant River cuts through the earth … creating a vertically walled slate gorge with numerous waterfalls. A trail follows the rim of the canyon offering hikers views of the falls and its geology. The gorge is 3 miles (4.8 km) long; the river drops 370 feet (110 m) in this distance boasting 130 feet (40 m) walls. Gulf Hagas is one of 14 National Natural Landmarks in the State of Maine, and is open to the public for a fee during the regular season.” Wikipedia

"A kayaker portaging the rapid 'Wedge'" Wikimedia

“A kayaker portaging the rapid ‘Wedge'”
Wikipedia

Stay tuned for posts about other “Grand Canyons” across America!