What’s New in State Parks?

The Friends of Robert H. Treman State Park sponsor this episode of Walk in the Park (161), featuring Finger Lakes State Parks Region environmental educator Josh Teeter. He explains some of the interesting things he gets involved in his job, including environmental education activities in state parks and environmental and cultural stewardship projects; such as protecting trees from insect pests, scaling loose rock on cliffs over trails, and wildlife conservation. Teeter shows us some of the new developments underway or planned for area state parks; including the overhaul of the main entrance at Watkins Glen State Park (with some of its planned interpretive facilities), the Black Diamond Trail, and a new bridge over the “fordway” to the campground at Robert H. Treman State Park.

Watch this episode online here (below) or on Ithaca cable channel 13 at the following times:

Thursday, March 2, 9:00 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 8:30 PM

Monday, 6:30 PM

Tuesday, March 7, 8:00 PM

Walk in the Park is produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions as an Ithaca, NY public access weekly television (PEGASYS) series shown on Ithaca area cable channel 13.

Icy Upper Treman

Walk in the Park episode 159. Winter ice chokes our gorges and makes them unsafe to walk in. But we can still get to some great viewing spots. One example is upper Robert H. Treman State Park, where we take a winter peek. In this episode, we also re-visit the effort to save our hemlock trees from the invasive pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid; we learn about how plant roots are able to figure out which way is down; and we consider what role the Ice Age had in shaping our landscape as demonstrated at Watkins Glen State Park.
You can watch this episode online (below) or on Ithaca, NY cable channel 13 at the following times:

Thursday, February 9, 9:00 PM

Friday, 3:30 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 8:30 PM

Tuesday, February 14, 12:00 PM and 8:00 PM

Walk in the Park is produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, in PEGASYS public access television studio in Ithaca, NY for cablecast on Ithaca’s cable channel 13 every week. Find out more about Ithaca public access TV.

 

 

Hemlock Trees Need Our Help!

Walk in the Park episode 155. Watch it online on this page, or on Ithaca public access cable TV channel 13 at the following dates and times:

Thursday, 1/5/17, 9:00 PM;  Friday 11:30 AM; Saturday 10:00 AM & 8:30 PM;

Sunday 10:00 AM & 6:00 PM; Monday 6:00 PM; Tuesday, 1/10/17, 8:00 PM

The eastern hemlock tree is a “foundation species” of our forests in the Finger Lakes and beyond in the Northeast. And it is being wiped out by an invasive insect, the “hemlock woolly adelgid.” Find out what is happening, what scientists are doing about it, and how you can help. This episode of Walk in the Park features the premier cablecast on Ithaca public access television of the acclaimed documentary film by area film maker Chris Foito, “The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid.” (And you can see the film independent of this Walk in the Park episode).

Winter is the best time to assess the occurrence and spread of hemlock woolly adelgid in our forests and the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network is seeking volunteers to help with monitoring. “This would entail about twenty minutes of training, and then walking and taking notes and locations of hemlock woolly adelgid on trees, via GPS (we provide everything needed). An afternoon outdoors in Jan, Feb and maybe March, locations still TBA. Contact Hilary Lambert, steward@cayugalake.org.”

Also, please visit the New York State Hemlock Initiative website for more information and to get involved.

Walk in the Park is a weekly public access cable television series produced at PEGASYS Studio in Ithaca, NY by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions. Find out more and see all Walk in the Park episodes and Park Minute videos.

Check out the Ithaca PEGASYS public access Facebook page, and the Walk in the Park Facebook page.

Saving Our Hemlock Forests

In episode 70 of Walk in the Park, we look at the attack by an invasive insect on our eastern hemlock trees in our forests and gorges and we find out what is being done in response. The schedule for cablecasts is below, along with the show online. And see the appeal for volunteers below!

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned.  If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component in our forests, particularly in our gorges.

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned. If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component in our forests, particularly in our gorges.

We join Cornell forest entomologist Mark Whitmore in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area in the City of Ithaca, NY, in the watershed for the water supply for the city. Mark explains and illustrates how the hemlock woolly adelgid, an aphid-like invasive insect, is killing the hemlock, a “keystone species” in our forests, and what larger impacts this has in our forest and stream ecosystems. But it’s not hopeless. Mark explains the biological controls that are being implemented to save at least some of our trees and set the stage for our forests’ recovery from this disaster over the long term. See how YOU CAN HELP below.

We wrap up the show with two short, beautiful videos of Taughannock Falls this winter and last.

This episode of the show will be cablecast beginning tonight (Thursday, February 26, 2015) at 9:00 on PEGASYS public access television channels 13 and 97.3 in the Ithaca area; and it will repeat on Saturday and Sunday (3/22-23) at 10:00 a.m. and the last scheduled cablecast will be next Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Or, you can watch it anytime ONLINE right here!

Note from 2/26/15 from Cayuga Lake Watershed Network: “Learn more about Hemlock Wooly Adelgid at a workshop/hike this Sunday March 1, from 12-2 at the Cayuga Nature Center (small entrance fee), or attend our Wells College campus workshop (free) on March 12 from 1-4 pm (rescheduled). Contact steward@cayugalake.org for more information.” https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cayuga-Lake-Watershed-Network/101436081850?fref=ts

For more information about hemlock woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer, and other invasive species threats to our lands, forests, and waters, please go to the New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Six Mile Creek, Trees and Water

Walk in the Park, episode 62, is now playing on Ithaca’s public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3)! Watch it Thursday night, 11/21/13, at 9:00, Saturday or Sunday at 10:30 a.m., or finally Tuesday, 11/26, at 8:00 p.m. Or here online!

Six Mile Creek has been the City of Ithaca’s water supply for more than 100 years. Two reservoir dams were built upstream in the watershed, but only the upper reservoir (“Third Dam” or “60-foot Dam”) now supplies municipal water. Join us as Roxy Johnston, the City’s Watershed Coordinator, takes us on a walk and talk tour in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area, telling us of the history of the watershed and the major rebuilding and renovation that is taking place now.

Construction of reservoir dam in Six Mile Creek watershed, Ithaca, NY Finger Lakes

In 1903, workers build one of the two dams in Six Mile Creek that have supplied the City of Ithaca's water supply. Photo courtesy of Roxy Johnston, City of Ithaca

We also join Mark Whitmore, forest entomologist from Cornell, as he explains the immense threats to our forests and our watershed from two invasive insects that attack major trees in our woodlands and gorges, including the eastern hemlock and all species of ash. Last episode, Whitmore explained the huge challenge forced upon us by the hemlock woolly adelgid, which we found in the Six Mile Creek Natural Area. This time, he addresses the emerald ash borer which is advancing toward us and will wipe out nearly all of our ash trees in our countryside and in town. Find out what we can do to respond to these inevitable assaults on our environment. [PLEASE NOTE: Late in the program, I mention, mistakenly, that there had been a report of the occurrence of emerald ash borer in Watkins Glen State Park. In fact, there is no record of any such report. My bad. Please ignore!]

Watch the show online here!

And, by the way, our popular book, ITHACA–THE CITY, GORGES, AND COLLEGES, is now out as an ebook. Check out the sample pages!

Gorge Tree Killer!

Walk in the Park TV episode 61

In the past few years, an alien invader has arrived in our forests in the Finger Lakes region, particularly in our gorges, and has begun to kill the eastern hemlock, one of our most beautiful species of trees. The culprit? A tiny, aphid-like insect called the “hemlock woolly adelgid.” It’s been found in Robert H. Treman State Park, it’s at Taughannock Falls, at Cornell Plantations, in Watkins Glen State Park, and at other sites.

This eastern hemlock tree at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca, NY is infested with the hemlock woolly adelgid and has been marked for possible treatment. The needles on the branches in the canopy of the tree are already heavily thinned. If all the needles and twigs die, the tree will die. Hemlock trees are an important ecological and aesthetic component of our forests, particularly in our gorges.

In this show, we join Mark Whitmore, forest entomologist at Cornell University, and the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network to look for this deadly invader from Asia in the Sixmile Creek Natural Area. Will we find it? What can be done about it? See the show to find out!

You can watch the show in the Ithaca, NY area on public access cable TV channel 13 (or 97.3). The first showing is tonight, Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 9:00. See the full schedule of showings.

Or watch it right here!

For more information on this and other invasive species in New York State, please visit the New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse website.

And, by the way, our popular book, ITHACA–THE CITY, GORGES, AND COLLEGES, is now out as an ebook. Check out the sample pages!