Kayaking in Antarctica!

Louise Adie kayaking in Antarctica

Louise Adie, Antarctic kayak guide, doing what she loves at the bottom of the world.

For ten years, Louise Adie of Trumansburg, NY has served as a kayak guide, interpretive naturalist, and ship historian on ecotour ships in Antarctica. Join us as Louise tells about her amazing experiences, using beautiful photographs, with whales, seals, penguins, icebergs, glaciers, and mountains on this extraordinary land at the bottom of the world. This is episode 67 of Walk in the Park TV, recorded on January 22, 2014 at PEGASYS public access TV studios in Ithaca, NY. See the full schedule of cablecasts for the week beginning 1/23/14.

This program is just a sample of one of Louise Adie’s illustrated lectures. The full presentation goes into a lot more detail with many more (and new) images. To contact Louise about booking one of these interpretive presentations send her an email at vesla2@aol.com, or go to her blog.

Louise Adie, Akademik Shokalskiy, Antarctica

Louise Adie (in the middle kayak) leading a kayak tour in Antarctica from the ship Akademik Shokalskiy years ago.

By the way, for five years, Louise worked on the Akademik Shokalskiy, which recently achieved fame for getting trapped in the ice in Antarctica. For the past five years, Louise has worked on other ships for Oceanwide Expeditions.

Gulf Hagas, Grand Canyon of Maine

Those of us in the Finger Lakes region of New York are fascinated by our gorges. And, of course, the grandest gorge of all we are familiar with in America is the Grand Canyon. But some 36 states besides Arizona claim to have a “Grand Canyon” of their state or region of the country.

At the northeast extreme of the US is Gulf Hagas, the “Grand Canyon of Maine,” or the “Grand Canyon of the East,” though other states claim to have the same. Gulf Hagas is in the Appalachian Trail Corridor of the National Park Service, part of the “Hundred Mile Wilderness,” the longest stretch of wilderness along this more than 2,000 mile footpath on the Appalachian Mountain chain and near the end of the “AT” at Baxter State Park on Mount Katahdin.

Map of Maine showing Gulf Hagas

Gulf Hagas, Maine’s “Grand Canyon,” is in the wilderness of the mountains of central Maine along the Appalachian Trail. Source: Wikipedia

 

"The West Branch of the Pleasant River cuts through the earth for three miles creating a vertically walled slate gorge with numerous waterfalls. A trail follows the rim of the canyon offering hikers views of the falls and its geology. The gorge is 3 miles (4.8 km) long; the river drops 370 feet (110 m) in this distance boasting 130 feet (40 m) walls.[1] Gulf Hagas is one of 14 National Natural Landmarks in the State of Maine,[2] and is open to the public for a fee during the regular season." Wikimedia

“The West Branch of the Pleasant River cuts through the earth … creating a vertically walled slate gorge with numerous waterfalls. A trail follows the rim of the canyon offering hikers views of the falls and its geology. The gorge is 3 miles (4.8 km) long; the river drops 370 feet (110 m) in this distance boasting 130 feet (40 m) walls. Gulf Hagas is one of 14 National Natural Landmarks in the State of Maine, and is open to the public for a fee during the regular season.” Wikipedia

"A kayaker portaging the rapid 'Wedge'" Wikimedia

“A kayaker portaging the rapid ‘Wedge'”
Wikipedia

Stay tuned for posts about other “Grand Canyons” across America!