Lake Ontario: A Quest for Hope, Part 2

In this episode of Walk in the Park (157) we continue with the second half of Susan Peterson Gately’s documentary about Lake Ontario and its health. (See Part 1, episode 156). You can watch this 30-minute show on this page online and on Ithaca, NY public access TV channel 13 at the following times:

Thursday, Jan. 19, 9:00 PM

Friday, 6:00 PM

Saturday, 10:00 AM and 7:00 PM

Sunday, 10:00 AM and 8:30 PM

Monday, 8:30 PM

Tuesday, 8:00 PM

Wednesday, 11:30 PM

Or watch it right here now!


Walk in the Park is a weekly public access TV series produced in Ithaca, NY at PEGASYS Studios. Produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions .

 

Lake Ontario: A Quest for Hope, Part 1

Walk in the Park episode 156. Watch it on Ithaca, NY TV or online right here! Cayuga Lake and all the other Finger Lakes are part of the Lake Ontario watershed, and what goes on in the watershed deeply affects the health of this easternmost of the five Great Lakes. We watch the first half of Susan Peterson Gately’s excellent and thorough environmental documentary, “Lake Ontario: A Quest for Hope.” We will show part 2 in the next episode of Walk in the Park. The schedule for Ithaca, NY area channel 13 cablecasts at this point is:

Thursday, Jan. 12, 9 PM

Friday Jan. 13, 11:30 AM, 3:30 PM, 8:30 PM

Saturday, Jan. 14, 10 AM

Sunday, Jan. 15, 10 AM; 7:30 PM

Monday, Jan. 16, 6:00 PM

Tuesday, Jan. 17, 8 PM

Additional cablecast times will be added soon. Or, watch it here now! (29 minutes)

Ms. Gately’s documentary is complementary to her book, Saving the Beautiful Lake: A Quest for Hope. Find out how to order this book and the DVD of this video.

Walk in the Park is produced by Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions, as a weekly public access TV series at PEGASYS Studio in Ithaca, NY.
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200 March in Watkins Glen

LPG gas Inergy Reading, NY, Watkins Glen, Seneca Lake

Inergy Corp.'s huge LPG (liquified petroleum gas) storage and distribution depot is being built in abandoned salt mines under Seneca Lake two miles north of the Village of Watkins Glen. Photo by Bill Hecht

WALK IN THE PARK episode 17 (recorded August 22), is now viewable online here and on Ithaca public access cable TV channel 13 (Thursday 9:00 p.m., Sat. & Sun. 10:30 a.m., and Tuesday at 8:00 p.m., each week).

[The first 15 seconds of the video below are silent. The show lasts 29 minutes.]

On August 17, 2012, more than 200 people marched from park to park through the streets of the Village of Watkins Glen, NY at the south end of Seneca Lake, largest of the Finger Lakes. They were protesting the construction of a huge northeast U.S. LPG (liquid petroleum gas) storage and distribution depot just two miles up the west shore of the lake in abandoned salt mines. Participants expressed their fears of pollution of the air by diesel and other fumes, pollution of the lake by spills of brine and other chemicals, the risk of accidents and even explosions that such facilities sometimes experience, and irreparable damage to the wine and tourism industry the region depends on. Speakers at rallies before and after the march included Dr. Sandra Steingraber, an acclaimed biologist, Lou Damiani, owner of Damiani Wine Cellars, and Nate Shinagawa, Democratic nominee for the 23rd Congressional District of New York. The march proceeded from Seneca Harbor Park to Lafayette Park in the village, then Watkins Glen State Park, and then returned to the waterfront at Seneca Lake Park.

This historic event, probably the largest protest ever to take place in this village, was well covered by newspapers in Elmira, Corning, and Hornell, but it was completely ignored by the Ithaca Journal and YNN TV news.

 

 

Angry Faces, Placid Water: Fracking, LPG Gas Storage, and Seneca Lake

LPG gas storage facility, hydrofracking, Seneca Lake, Watkins Glen, Finger Lakes

Inergy Corporation, though it has yet to receive a permit from the DEC, is going ahead with construction of its northeast regional LPG gas storage depot on the west shore of Seneca Lake. Photo by Bill Hecht

The oil and gas industry plans to build an enormous liquid petroleum gas storage and distribution depot in abandoned salt mines under Seneca Lake near Watkins Glen, one of New York’s most popular scenic tourist attractions. Part of the Marcellus Shale hydrofracking nightmare, this huge facility threatens the pure water of Seneca Lake with petroleum gas and salt pollution, would burn off excess gas with a towering flare stack, produce air pollution, and be a visual and noisy blight along this gorgeous lake. Worst of all would be the constant risk of gas explosions. Local resident, writer, and activist Elaine Mansfield eloquently presents this issue in her blog entry last week. She also reads it aloud in this short, illustrated video I shot in Smith Park along the shore of Seneca Lake. Learn more about this issue from the citizens group Gas Free Seneca.