Hanging Valley Waterfalls

Taughannock Falls

Taughannock Falls

Many if not most of our waterfalls in the Finger Lakes of New York can be classified as occurring in “hanging valleys.” That is, they have formed where gorges drop into larger valleys that were greatly deepened by the passage of glaciers; hence these side valley gorges were left suspended, or “hanging,” above these main glacial troughs. In this episode of Walk in the Park (#81, recorded on July 16, 2014 at PEGASYS Studios, Ithaca, NY), we look at the hanging valley waterfalls along the southern end of the Cayuga Lake valley near Ithaca, NY. Then we compare them with two of the most famous hanging waterfalls in the United States–Yosemite Falls and Bridalveil Fall in Yosemite National Park. We conclude with a beautiful video about Yosemite Falls produced by the Yosemite Conservancy in their Yosemite Nature Notes series.

You can watch this episode beginning tonight (Thursday, 7/17/14) at 9:00 p.m. on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channels 13 and 97.3. It will show again on Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m., and finally next Tuesday, 7/22, at 8:00 p.m.

Or, you can watch it right here anytime!

Park Minute: Yosemite Falls!

Yosemite Falls in California is the highest waterfall in North America, with a total fall of 2,425 feet. This Park Minute (#19) shows the great falls from a number of gorgeous perspectives. Yosemite National Park celebrates its 150 anniversary as a park this summer, since the signing of the Yosemite Grant by President Abraham Lincoln on June 30, 1864.

Find out more about Yosemite National Park in our Ithaca, NY public access TV series episode of Walk in the Park.

Park Minute is produced and published by Owl Gorge Productions (http://owlgorge.com) in Ithaca, NY. See our national award-winning book about Watkins Glen State Park.

See more Park Minutes.

The Conservation Legacy of John Muir

John Muir, American conservationist

John Muir in 1907

John Muir was one of our earliest, most famous, and most effective advocates for the preservation of wilderness. His efforts in California in the late 1800s helped protect Yosemite Valley and led to the creation of Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks. President Theodore Roosevelt sought his counsel. John Muir was a founder of the Sierra Club, one of America’s oldest and most powerful conservation organizations. And some have called Muir the “Father of the National Park Service.”

John Muir’s biographer, Steven J. Holmes, wrote, “Muir has profoundly shaped the very categories through which Americans understand and envision their relationships with the natural world.”

Our current episode of Walk in the Park (#80, beginning showing tonight, 7/3/14, at 9:00 on Ithaca, NY’s public access cable channels 13 and 97.3) features the National Park Service biography film, “John Muir: A Glorious Legacy.” Showings will repeat this weekend on both days at 10:30 a.m. and will conclude on Tuesday, July 8, at 8:00 p.m.

For those who can’t or don’t wish to watch this on Ithaca cable TV, I have included “John Muir: A Glorious Legacy” embedded below, in two parts.

Part 1

Part 2

By the way, our national award-winning book, A WALK THROUGH WATKINS GLEN: WATER’S SCULPTURE IN STONE, is being reprinted now. Preliminary copies will be delivered to the Watkins Glen State Park gift shop today. Find out more.